PwC launches Flexible Talent Network

flexible working

 

Accountancy firm PwC is opening up a new recruitment route to respond to the increasing demand from people to work flexibly and forgo traditional working patterns.

PwC says its Flexible Talent Network has been created to give people the opportunity to work for the firm without being tied into a full-time contract and standard working hours.

People can choose a working pattern that works for them, such as term-time only, and will apply to PwC’s Flexible Talent Network based on the skills they have and the working pattern that best works for them, rather than for specific roles. PwC will then match people in the network with relevant projects.

FTN members who work 20 hours or more per week will be eligible to participate in PwC’s pension scheme, flexible benefits scheme and other staff benefits. PwC says compensation for personal leave, holiday and sick leave depends on contract arrangements and are down to the recruiting manager.

Over 2,000 people have already registered for PwC’s Flexible Talent Network in the first two weeks. It follows research carried out with 2,000 people in the UK by PwC shows that nearly half (46%) of people say flexible working and a culture of good work/life balance is the most important factor when choosing a job.

Back To Business Programme

Alongside the Flexible Talent Network, PwC is also recruiting for the next intake of its Back to Business return to work programme. The six-month paid senior internship programme is designed to help senior professionals to restart their career after an extended break.

Laura Hinton, chief people officer at PwC, said: “We already encourage everyday flexibility for our people in how and where they work, but our Flexible Talent Network takes flexible working to a new level – allowing people to choose exactly how they want to work throughout the year.

“People in the network will get to spend their year their way, whether it’s because of caring commitments, entrepreneurs supplementing their income, people who want to travel or simply not work all of the year.

“Offering flexibility in how people work throughout the year is not only good for workers, but also for business, the economy and ultimately society. We’re likely to see a rise in people transitioning in and out of work throughout their careers and those organisations who responsibly support their people to do this will ultimately gain a competitive advantage.”



Post a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *