A comprehensive guide to flexible working hours

Considering flexible working? Or have you received a flexible working request from an employee? Read our comprehensive guide to flexible working hours by employment expert Jane Barclay.

Flexible Working Hours

Flexible working could help to reduce the rising employee absence trend

Flexible Working can cover working different times/ hours or working from a different location. For Example:

  • Part Time Hours
  • Flexi-time
  • Compressed Working Hours
  • Job Sharing
  • Shift Work
  • Working from Home
  • Career Breaks
  • Annual Hours

Background

Why has this come about? The UK workforce has become more diverse…. reflecting changes in society:  an increase in women at work, single parents, our ageing population etc.

Domestic & family responsibilities have also shifted over the years and in response legislation has evolved & changed to offer both men and women the opportunity to request flexible working.

Legislative Requirements

The need to provide parents with more flexible working patterns was identified following the issue of the Government’s Green Paper – “Work and Parents: Competitiveness and Choice”.

The Government subsequently set up the Work and Parents Taskforce to consider the issue of working parents and flexible working.

They submitted their final report – “About Time: Flexible Working” at the end of 2001 and this has formed the basis of the Act which covers eligibility & procedural requirements. It has since been updated in June 2014 to extend the right to request flexible working to all employees.

Why should we as the employer consider Flexible Working seriously?

Cost Savings due to reduced absenteeism

Flexible working could help to reduce the rising employee absence trend. More progressive companies believe that by allowing workers time off to deal with personal issues and childcare, there is less likelihood of employees having to resort to calling in sick.

Improved Retention rates

Those skilled employees who take on parental responsibilities may find it difficult to juggle full-time office based work with childcare issues and therefore offering flexibility helps to retain those may have otherwise left your organisation to seek more flexible work elsewhere.

This means cost savings through not having to recruit or train replacements.

Increased flexibility for your customers

In our increasingly global environment with rising customer expectations of service levels and access to products etc, offering flexible working may well mean that you can adapt more effectively to your customers’ needs.

Whilst the initial steps in deviating from historical working patterns / practices can seem daunting, the benefits to your customers and therefore your business in the long term may be realised.

Improved employee motivation & reputation as an employer

Whilst a desire for flexible working may not be a motivator for all employees, those who have been offered the opportunity to balance their work and home life tend to be extremely grateful.

Indeed within companies offering flexible working opportunities to all employees irrespective of legal obligations, employee engagement & satisfaction ratings tend to be higher.

Employees generally are more motivated and committed – and prepared to go the extra mile if they feel their employer is being accommodating of their requirements.

High performing employees are likely to have more choices in terms of employer, therefore offering flexible working as a benefit is likely to give you more access to the best employees, as an employer with a good reputation for balancing business and employee needs.

Moving with the times! – get ahead socially & technologically

Some would say that we are moving into a new world where different people will work different hours at different stages of their lives, utilising the fast moving technological advances we’re experiencing.

Some would also say that socially employers have a responsibility to enable parents to spend some more time with their children: statistics suggest that some of the current social problems in the UK are a result of parents spending less time with their children.

By encouraging more quality time for families, improvements in society will be seen in the longer term ie reduced vandalism & crime, and a more skilled youth.

Employers need to consider how they want to be perceived by current and prospective employees, and also what kind of values they represent.

Stakeholders and customers alike will also likely be influenced by both the working environment created by the employer and the employer’s approach to the community/society.

Aside from any social arguments, there are robust business benefits to be gained from being more progressive than you have been historically: Think creatively yet logically: Home working can reduce overhead costs for employers (eg desk/office sharing) so by recognising the amount of work that is done in many roles using today’s technology ie computers, telephone etc, employers can often utilise home working requests to their advantage – limited interruptions too can serve to increase productivity.

See the later section called Tips for Managers – how to make it work in practice.

The Rules…

To be eligible to apply to work flexibly the applicant must…

  • Be an employee with 26 weeks continuous service on the date the application is made.
  • Not have made another application to work flexibly under this right during the past 12 months.

Making the Application…

The application from the individual must be made to the employer in writing by email or letter.The application must include:

  • the date
  • a statement that this is a statutory request
  • details of how the employee wants to work flexibly and when they want to start
  • an explanation of how they think flexible working might affect the business and how this could be dealt with, eg if they’re not at work on certain days
  • a statement saying if and when they’ve made a previous application

The Process

The basic steps are:

  • The employee writes to the employer.
  • The employer considers the request and makes a decision within 3 months – or longer if agreed with the employee. Employers must deal with requests in a ‘reasonable manner’.Examples of handling requests in a reasonable manner include: assessing the advantages and disadvantages of the application; holding a meeting to discuss the request with the employee; and offering an appeal process.
  • If the employer agrees to the request, they must change the terms and conditions in the employee’s contract. This should be done as soon as possible, but no later than 28 days after the request was approved.
  • If the employer disagrees, they must write to the employee giving the business reasons for the refusal. The employee may be able to complain to an employment tribunal.

Tips for Managers…

When considering the request, ask yourself the following questions to make sure you have thought about every aspect of the proposal.  Just because something has previously ‘not been the norm’, it doesn’t mean it wouldn’t or couldn’t work now and in the future.

‘Thinking outside of the box’ could enable you to turn a request into a positive opportunity for your business.

Job Analysis

  • Do the Employee’s proposed hours fit in with the tasks outlined in the role?
  • If not, could the tasks be divided up differently?
  • Could you re-allocate some of the work to another team member?
  • What will be the impact on customers of this change – could it be used to our customers’ advantage?
  • Is there a compromise that could be reached that will satisfy the individual’s requirements as well as the company’s objectives?

Managing the New Arrangements

  • How will the new arrangements be supervised and performance measured? Ensure outputs can be measured where possible and not the number of hours worked – set clear objectives and measure quality of service/work. Obtain & give feedback regularly.
  • Will the long-term benefits outweigh the short-term costs of implementing the change?
  • Will there be any Health and Safety considerations? (For example, a Health and Safety Workstation assessment will need to be completed for those working from home).

Impact on the Team

  • Advise other team members of the change
  • Ensure flexible workers remain informed and arrange for all important information to be forwarded onto them
  • Involved flexible workers in all aspects of team-working
  • Consider offering flexible working to those not covered by the Flexible Working regulations – this will help to combat any resentment from those employees who may have non-parental reasons for wanting to work flexibly (studying, outside interests, voluntary work, caring for other relatives etc)

How can I make it work in practice?

Job sharing normally consists of two individuals sharing a full-time position (in varying proportions ie 50/50 or 60/40 etc, however they should have separate employment contracts stating the agreed hours to be worked accordingly. Many arrangements allow for some overlap to ensure sufficient communication / handover.

With notice, some job share individuals will be happy to cover their “partner’s” absences eg providing holiday cover etc without the need to source additional temporary support in such cases.

Job sharing may come about by two current employees agreeing to share a role, or by a previously full-time employee wishing to reduce their hours and the employer agreeing to advertise the rest of the role as a job share position.

Whilst there may be some additional costs incurred (due to some overlap of hours for handover purposes, some benefits not able to be pro-rated eg Private Medical Insurance etc), most job share arrangements once established offer the employer increased flexibility and the benefit of higher morale & commitment.

Whilst managing two individuals rather than one may sound onerous, their different skills / work style preferences may well complement each other well to provide you as the employer a wider array of skills and abilities.

Home Working can often be an ideal solution for companies wishing to implement office/desk sharing thus saving in overhead costs. Furthermore, certain duties / aspects of a role can be carried out very productively from home – with no office distractions or interruptions.

Whilst historically there have been concerns about how to manage employees remotely, many companies now measure success on outputs / quality of work & have found that some home working can be extremely productive. It may be worth reviewing your approach to Appraisals and criteria for measuring performance – remember just because someone is located in the office where you can ‘supervise’ them, it doesn’t mean they’re more productive than someone working from home with specific duties / tasks to perform.

A Workstation Assessment should be carried out to ensure compliance with Health & Safety regulations and consideration needs to be given to confidentiality of information being accessed from home – but these issues are easily overcome and can be outweighed by cost savings and increased productivity, as well as higher employee motivation & commitment.

Preventing resentment amongst staff who are not covered by this legislation can be a perceived challenge for some employers. One of the best ways to overcome this is by opening up the opportunity to request flexible working to all employees.

Whilst the concept sounds appealing, you will likely find that many employees choose not to request flexible working. Ideas such as enabling occasional home working on certain types of work, extended unpaid leave during quieter business periods, staggered start and finish times can all be turned into business benefits offering customers more flexibility and higher productivity & cost savings for the employer.

Refusing the Application? …

Any refusal will need to be made to the application in writing.  You will need to give a valid legitimate business reason if you are going to refuse the request, and you will need to think about your reasons carefully. Applications for flexible working arrangements can be refused only for the following reasons:

  • The additional costs will impose a burden.
  • Agreeing to the request will have a detrimental effect on ability to meet customer demand.
  • Inability to re-organise work among existing staff.
  • Inability to recruit additional staff.
  • Agreeing to the request will have a detrimental impact on quality.
  • Agreeing to the request will have a detrimental impact on performance.
  • There is insufficient work during the periods the employee proposes to work.
  • There are planned structural changes.

The reason needs to be detailed clearly in the letter. There is no statutory right to appeal against a rejection, but it is advised under the terms of handling a request in a reasonable fashion.

Failure to follow the guidelines could lead to a claim – the time limit for bringing a claim to an employment tribunal is three months from the date the employee is notified of the decision on appeal or breach of this procedure.

If the claim is successful, the tribunal may order the employer to reconsider the request and award maximum compensation of eight weeks’ pay.

*Written by HR consultant Jane Barclay. 

[This overview is intended for general advice only – employers should consult an employment lawyer for assistance with legal matters]. More information from Acas.


Comments [232]

  • Anonymous says:

    Advice please. My husband and I both work shift he does nights and days. I work 3 nights a week. When our shifts over lap my mother in law would have the kids. She is moving this week so will no longer be able to have the kids. When I first mention Ed this to my boss he said don’t worry. I then sent him a list of dates from now till ja uary. He said he is not able to accommodate all 5hoa3 date and moved two of them. Is 5his classed as a request for flexible working hrs? He says I can’t have some dates as sale begins those days. I have tried moving my holiday but still says no. I literally need to survive till march for the next holiday year. The stress and worry is making me ill. Family and friends say just tell them u can’t work it u have no one to have your kids. I am worried if I do this he will be forced to find someone else for my position.

    • Mandy Garner

      Mandy Garner says:

      Hi,
      It sounds like you have just asked informally about changing your hours. You could consider putting in a formal request, as outlined in this article, as then your employer will have to give a reason if they turn you down. Flexible working can be a negotiation process and as part of the formal process you have to outline what the impact might be on your employer. It is a good idea, if you anticipate your employer may turn down a request, to think of ways around their possible objections, such as lack of staff to cover.

  • Anonymous says:

    I have been offered additional hours on my current contract, the problem is i can’t work the Friday night they have offered me due to childcare issues. Can I request flexible working? I can work Tuesday night instead of Friday night.

    • Mandy Garner

      Mandy Garner says:

      You will have to negotiate on hours with your employer – tell them you can’t do the Friday nights, but could do other hours. It would not be a question of flexible working because that would apply to changing your existing hours.

  • Kay Cardwell says:

    Hi
    I need some advice on the current flexible working that was agreed for me back in 2015. I work on the railway 3 set days with the same start and finish times with a diagram that was already established within a rolling roster. However our conductor diagrams are changing quite significantly with a new timetable due for release in May and the diagram that made up the set job I work will be no longer. My direct line manager says he is struggling with trying to find an alternative turn I could work within the agreed hours but my question is the fact that this change is being implemented by the company and them having agreed the flexible working on a permanent change to my contract are they not responsible for making an actual new diagram if needs be just for me to suit with the hours, days, start and finish times that were first agreed?. Thanks

  • Zen says:

    I’m working only for 8hrs on weekends in a store as cashier my baby is 11 months now she does not stay with anyone and start crying only with me and husband she is happy….. And my husband works only 3days for 12hrs and 3days off as I’m working for 8hrs on weekends had requested my manager for flexible hours when my husband is off so that he can take care of baby when I’m working but my manager rejected my request saying that as per contract it’s 8hrs on weekends again I requested him and he said it’s difficult for him to manage and told me to leave the job if I cannot manage my contractual hours.. Can anyone help me for the same…. Is there no choice for me for flexible hours when my husband is off…. One of my friend suggested me that government has a rule to provide flexible hours for young working mothers or parents….

    • Mandy Garner

      Mandy Garner says:

      Hi Jenny,
      Under flexible working legislation, you can apply to change your hours, but your employer does not have to agree to this. There are eight reasons they can give to turn down a request, mentioned in this article. Those making a flexible working application need to consider what the impact might be on the business and suggest ways around this. That will make it more likely that their request will be accepted. Have you made a formal flexible working request as outlined in this article?

  • Kelly says:

    Hi

    I wonder if you can help. I have been with my current company for 18 months now, when advertised the job was detailed as home based and when interviewed for this role I was advised it was largely home based with 2/3 days in the office and 2/3 days at home depending on meetings and work requirements which was a significant factor in me taking the job, for the last 18 months this has been the standard working pattern. We now have a new line manager who has decided that we are to be in the office 5 days a week, do we have any way to appeal this decision given we have worked to this pattern for 18 months?

  • Anon says:

    I have made a formal request for flexible working 8 weeks prior to return to work date. I am on shared parental leave as a father and previously work 5 days per week on a rotating shift pattern. The flexible request was to reduce my hours to 3 days per week. I attempted to contact my two line managers who were on annual leave to discuss but to no avail. Shortly after their return (9 days after my application) I received an email stating that 3 days working was not possible due to abstraction of staff to another department for a four month trial on a business model (I accept there may be some business need to refuse my initial request), but a job share might be considered working 2.5 days but only if the other post was filled. I asked the Line manager to consider job share.

    The manager contacted me by email asking what hours and times I would like to work in order that they could advertise the job share post. I responded with my suggestion for preferred working hours to be told that I would have to work 2 days one week and 3 days the following week etc. At the same time I asked how long this process of recruiting a job share person would take to be told that this would take circa 4-5 months if they were to even get applicants (though it appears to be standard that roles are filled within 8-10 weeks within the organisation generally). I was also told that whilst the other half of the job share is not filled I would have to continue working full time.

    My concern is that the line manager has not asked me to attend a meeting or discussed within 28 days (?) or asked me to call and when I have called the office they are not available. They are aware that I live and commute 100 miles per day, live in a rural area, am the only driver in the household and are aware that my 3 year old suffers epilepsy, heart conditions and has speech/development delay to the degree he will have to have a one to one assistant when attending receptions class next year. I am not sure to what, if any, degree HR know of my personal circumstances.

    I feel that line manager had good business grounds to decline my flexible working request but at no point have they or the organization considered the health of my child. I also feel the line manager has offered the job share option and has decided to drag out the process in order that I return to work full time and eventually give up on the job share idea.

    Am I being discriminated against on grounds of being a man or having (though not yet diagnosed as disabled) a child with health/cognitive issues?

    • Mandy Garner

      Mandy Garner says:

      Hi,
      Thanks for your email. Your employer should legally deal with your flexible working request within a three-month period [the 28 days you refer to comes from the previous legislation which was updated when flexible working was extended]. Have you asked them what they are doing to find a job share? The timescale they have given seems long. Is there anything you can do to expedite this, for instance, suggesting someone within the organisation who might job share with you? There are several job share organisations such as Further&More that your employer could consider using. Unfortunately, they do not have to consider employees’ caring responsibilities when they look at a flexible working request. They have to base their decision on the business case for granting a request. They can only turn down a request for one of eight reasons and they need to show they have dealt with the request in a reasonable manner – see https://www.workingmums.co.uk/flexible-working-a-guide/ . You could point out the time limit on the flexible working legislation and ask for details of what they are doing to find a job share. Having suggested this option, they would need to show they are actively pursuing it.

  • Mino Gakhal says:

    Hi I made a flexible working request whilst on maternity leave however my line manager declined my request. I am now in the process of getting ACAS involved for early conciliation but upon reading the guidance I realised I didn’t submit my request properly and simply sent an email to my line manager requesting to reduce and compress my hours from 37.5 to 30 hours. Should I resubmit this as a formal request but not to be considered as a separate request? My line manager has treated my request as formal.

  • Anonymous says:

    Hello

    I need some help with an issue regarding my recent formal application for flexible working.

    Initially a meeting was held with both my managers and the head of HR to discuss the viability of me and a colleague being able to undertake flexible working. All went well and it was agreed that there was no reason for it not to be accepted. In fact it went that well, that as a goodwill gesture my colleague and myself agreed we would help the organisation “when needed” and work weekends on a shared 1 in 5 weekend rota should it be needed, we currently only work weekdays. Saturday & Sundays are worked voluntarily at a higher overtime payrate.

    I submitted my formal application on the 26th October 2016 expecting to start flexible working on the 1st November it been agreed in the meeting this request wouldn’t affect my current terms and conditions.

    The issue I have is that I bumped into my senior manager in the corridor, who in passing mentioned that if I were to submit my application, I would be required to work more weekends than we had agreed and at my basic weekday pay rate. I was also told that the majority of weekday work wouldn’t be offered to me as he would be offering this work to other members of staff.

    This would be detrimental to my earning ability and also that I would be treated unfairly regarding receiving weekday work.

    Where do I stand as I feel that my request has been detrimental to my current terms and conditions.

    I have already spoken to HR but they have said that I voluntarily withdrew my application and that what was being offered was perfectly ok.

    • Mandy Garner

      Mandy Garner says:

      Hi,
      Could you email mandy@workingmums.co.uk with more details. I am a bit confused. Did you have an informal chat about flexible working before you filed your formal application and did you then withdraw it? Your original application should be considered based on your original job and if they put an alternative deal to you you could turn that down if it is not the same as your original proposal and return to your original position.

    • Linda says:

      I have been in a debate at work a staff member only works morning shifts never late she said that was agreed at interview. Well I was always told care work is flexible hours. My boss said it’s illegal to change her contract terms is this true

  • gary says:

    hi there , looking for some advice,
    i have worked on flexibile working hours for over 4 years now which means 1 dont work past 7 as my parter works nights . they have now told me that i have to start working to midnight which means my partner would have to resign . they have told me there is no other option other than reducing my hours to do part time mornings . can they take my flexibile hours from me? Also have nothing in writing regarding my flexibile working hours i have asked for my contract on 2 occasions and still waiting . what would you advise

  • Natalie Welch says:

    I have been working 22.5 hours for over two years 10am to 2pm Monday to Friday although my contract only specifies the total number. We are having a member of staff that does a different job to me leave whom works the same total hours but works to 5pm twice a week. My work have told me in a PDR having discussed nothing else that my job role will now include all of the duties in this other position for half the week as it is job share and that they are changing my hours to working to 5 two days a week. My total hours do not change, and neither does my pay. I am a single mum of two and don’t know if I can get a free bus and my youngest is only just starting senior school this year and I feel it is too early for her to be left straight away. Can they do this? My job description does say that I “cover cashiers” which I did in their lunch hour and when one of them was on holiday. But covering another role permanently is very different. Can they do this? There are changes to both jobs that will be happening but this could not be fully implemented for months and would not be completed for years. What can I do to still work my same hours but do as much as I can of both jobs? Please advise. Thanks

  • anonymous says:

    Hello,

    Homeworking is currently being offered to managers at the moment. I am a working mum to 2 young children 9 years and 16 months working full time. I am thinking of asking for homeworking in order to work the full day of 9 to 6 instead of what I currently do which is 930am to 5pm shift so I can leave to dropoff/pick up my kids from separate childcare providers. I want to be able to work a full day but also cut down on fuel costs for school run and my 9 year old is old enough to come home at 3 and do homework etc until I finish work at 6pm. It will enable me to also service my clients for a longer day opposed to what I do now. I have been told my request will be denied because it is only for managers – my question is ‘Can they do this’.

  • Maria says:

    I currently work as cabin crew for the last 4 years full time on a random flexi roster (up to 6 days working). I am on maternity leave now. The company used to offer set days as flexible working (2 set days one week 3 days the next for 50%) now they only offer two weeks on two weeks off, the two weeks on is full time and random days (still up to 6 days working) which only find out on the 17th of each month for the following month. This is not suitable or arranging child care as no one will take that you have to pay for the full month as you don’t know what days. Is this legal despite being highly unfair?!

  • Sian says:

    I have had a flexible working agreement since sept 2013 when my child started school, I work 10-2 Mon-Fri during term time and evenings during school holidays. I have just got a new manager who has said he wants to change my hours and wants to review my flexible working agreement. Can he do this?

  • Anonymous says:

    i have said i will reduce my hours and do 7-12 and still a no, ive explained i dont want to work full night shift till 7am because of the fact i have to drive 20 miles to get my daughter to her special school and with no rest in between leaving work and school run it would be dangerous for us both, they seen to de against every thing i suggest

    Editor: Have you filed a formal flexible working request? They would have to justify the changes with this and consider all options and could run the risk of a discrimination case on the grounds of the childcare issue.

  • Anonymous says:

    i have said i will reduce my hours and do 7-12 and still a no, ive explained i dont want to work full night shift till 7am because of the fact i have to drive 20 miles to get my daughter to her special school and with no rest in between leaving work and school run it would be dangerous for us both, they seen to de against every thing i suggest

    Editor: Have you filed a formal flexible working request? They would have to justify the changes with this and consider all options and could run the risk of a discrimination case on the grounds of the childcare issue.

  • Anonymous says:

    i have said i will reduce my hours and do 7-12 and still a no, ive explained i dont want to work full night shift till 7am because of the fact i have to drive 20 miles to get my daughter to her special school and with no rest in between leaving work and school run it would be dangerous for us both, they seen to de against every thing i suggest

    Editor: Have you filed a formal flexible working request? They would have to justify the changes with this and consider all options and could run the risk of a discrimination case on the grounds of the childcare issue.

  • Anonymous says:

    i am a member of usdaw but have found them to be as good as a chocolate tea pot on a number off occations i have needed them. i contacted them over a week ago have another meeting on monday and they still havent got bak to me….the grounds are peoples shopping habits have changed so they want to move me that's all the reasons i have been given.

  • Anonymous says:

    i am a member of usdaw but have found them to be as good as a chocolate tea pot on a number off occations i have needed them. i contacted them over a week ago have another meeting on monday and they still havent got bak to me….the grounds are peoples shopping habits have changed so they want to move me that's all the reasons i have been given.

  • Anonymous says:

    i am a member of usdaw but have found them to be as good as a chocolate tea pot on a number off occations i have needed them. i contacted them over a week ago have another meeting on monday and they still havent got bak to me….the grounds are peoples shopping habits have changed so they want to move me that's all the reasons i have been given.

    Editor: Have you applied formally for flexible working? Agreeing to the request will have a detrimental effect on ability to meet customer demand to turn that down, but they would have to go into more detail. Is there any other shift that might work with your childcare commitments where there is greater customer demand so that you can meet a compromise? Flexible working requests are a negotiation process with both parties taking into account the other's concerns. In addition as women are generally the main childcarers in a family, any decision to refuse a flexible working request from a woman with childcare responsibilities may be indirect discrimination.

  • Anonymous says:

    yes it means i cant do the job it involves to much walking and my injury is to my foot, i have worked from 8pm for 8 years in total on set hours they are the same each week, i have asked for flexible working hours and they have said no i can only work till 10 although we are a 24hr store, also another girl is allwed to work 12 midnight to 4am when it suits her familys needs and her child does not have any additional needs, surely this is unfair.

    Editor: Are you a member of a union and is there a union rep you can speak to? Have you put in a formal request for flexible working as then they have to address it seriously rather than just dismiss it out of hand and you can work towards a compromise? If you have gone through a formal process, on what grounds have they turned it down as there are only eight allowed grounds under the legislation – see https://www.workingmums.co.uk/extending-flexible-working-2/. Does your contract allow for changes to hours to suit business needs?

  • Anonymous says:

    i have been working 8pm till 3am for 12 mths now, i have been told they are moving my hours to 5pm- 10pm, i have explained i have a child with learning disability's and that she attend a special school where they don't finish until 4.45 and by the time we are home it 6pm, they are not accepting any of this, they have offered me another position which i feel unable to do due to an injury at work in 2008 for which i had surgery and they admitted liability. they have said they can constructively dissmiss me is this right?

    Editor: It depends on several factors. Does your contract allow for changing of shifts? Also, is the job they have offered you a suitable alternative? You mention that you have an injury. Does this mean you cannot do this job? You would need to give more details. You could file a flexible work request to try and get your shifts fixed around your childcare – see https://www.workingmums.co.uk/changing-shift-patterns-the-new-legislation-2/

  • Anonymous says:

    yes it means i cant do the job it involves to much walking and my injury is to my foot, i have worked from 8pm for 8 years in total on set hours they are the same each week, i have asked for flexible working hours and they have said no i can only work till 10 although we are a 24hr store, also another girl is allwed to work 12 midnight to 4am when it suits her familys needs and her child does not have any additional needs, surely this is unfair.

    Editor: Are you a member of a union and is there a union rep you can speak to? Have you put in a formal request for flexible working as then they have to address it seriously rather than just dismiss it out of hand and you can work towards a compromise? If you have gone through a formal process, on what grounds have they turned it down as there are only eight allowed grounds under the legislation – see https://www.workingmums.co.uk/extending-flexible-working/. Does your contract allow for changes to hours to suit business needs?

  • Anonymous says:

    i have been working 8pm till 3am for 12 mths now, i have been told they are moving my hours to 5pm- 10pm, i have explained i have a child with learning disability's and that she attend a special school where they don't finish until 4.45 and by the time we are home it 6pm, they are not accepting any of this, they have offered me another position which i feel unable to do due to an injury at work in 2008 for which i had surgery and they admitted liability. they have said they can constructively dissmiss me is this right?

    Editor: It depends on several factors. Does your contract allow for changing of shifts? Also, is the job they have offered you a suitable alternative? You mention that you have an injury. Does this mean you cannot do this job? You would need to give more details. You could file a flexible work request to try and get your shifts fixed around your childcare.

  • Anonymous says:

    yes it means i cant do the job it involves to much walking and my injury is to my foot, i have worked from 8pm for 8 years in total on set hours they are the same each week, i have asked for flexible working hours and they have said no i can only work till 10 although we are a 24hr store, also another girl is allwed to work 12 midnight to 4am when it suits her familys needs and her child does not have any additional needs, surely this is unfair.

    Editor: Are you a member of a union and is there a union rep you can speak to? Have you put in a formal request for flexible working as then they have to address it seriously rather than just dismiss it out of hand and you can work towards a compromise? If you have gone through a formal process, on what grounds have they turned it down as there are only eight allowed grounds under the legislation –

  • Anonymous says:

    i have been working 8pm till 3am for 12 mths now, i have been told they are moving my hours to 5pm- 10pm, i have explained i have a child with learning disability's and that she attend a special school where they don't finish until 4.45 and by the time we are home it 6pm, they are not accepting any of this, they have offered me another position which i feel unable to do due to an injury at work in 2008 for which i had surgery and they admitted liability. they have said they can constructively dissmiss me is this right?

    Editor: It depends on several factors. Does your contract allow for changing of shifts? Also, is the job they have offered you a suitable alternative? You mention that you have an injury. Does this mean you cannot do this job? You would need to give more details. You could file a flexible work request to try and get your shifts fixed around your childcare.

  • Anonymous says:

    I asked my manager if she would not put me to work in partnership with another work colleague because he corsets me to much stress she said she will try am I obliged to have to work alongside this person we work in a nursing home

    Editor: You will have to give more details of the kind of problems you have with this person. Are they harassing or bullying you? 

  • Anonymous says:

    I asked my manager if she would not put me to work in partnership with another work colleague because he corsets me to much stress she said she will try am I obliged to have to work alongside this person we work in a nursing home

    Editor: You will have to give more details of the kind of problems you have with this person. Are they harassing or bullying you? 

  • Anonymous says:

    I asked my manager if she would not put me to work in partnership with another work colleague because he corsets me to much stress she said she will try am I obliged to have to work alongside this person we work in a nursing home

    Editor: You will have to give more details of the kind of problems you have with this person. Are they harassing or bullying you? 

  • Anonymous says:

    I'm due back to work in 6 weeks I am going back on 16 hours which work have agreed work won't tell me my shifts but I need to know so that I can arrange childcare when do they need to tell me.

    Editor: Will these be permanent hours? If your shifts are subject to change legally they just have to give you 'reasonable' warning. If they are changing your hours permanently they need to write to you with your new hours within a month of agreeing them. Explain to them that you have to book childcare and it is in their interests to ensure it is in place or you may have to take time off for dependents to deal with the childcare situation.

  • Anonymous says:

    I'm due back to work in 6 weeks I am going back on 16 hours which work have agreed work won't tell me my shifts but I need to know so that I can arrange childcare when do they need to tell me.

    Editor: Will these be permanent hours? If your shifts are subject to change legally they just have to give you 'reasonable' warning. If they are changing your hours permanently they need to write to you with your new hours within a month of agreeing them. Explain to them that you have to book childcare and it is in their interests to ensure it is in place or you may have to take time off for dependents to deal with the childcare situation.

  • Anonymous says:

    I'm due back to work in 6 weeks I am going back on 16 hours which work have agreed work won't tell me my shifts but I need to know so that I can arrange childcare when do they need to tell me.

    Editor: Will these be permanent hours? If your shifts are subject to change legally they just have to give you 'reasonable' warning. If they are changing your hours permanently they need to write to you with your new hours within a month of agreeing them. Explain to them that you have to book childcare and it is in their interests to ensure it is in place or you may have to take time off for dependents to deal with the childcare situation.

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi i ask my boss for change me for part time and he said No and said my contract zero hours and this a factory not social service this not my problem if you have family!!!! I work for there 2 years, my maternity 39w end in 4 march and 52 in 4 june! My contract 0 hours full-time i ask for work tuesdays wednesdays and thursday 9h till 14h because i have 3 kids in fvll time school 10y 7y 5y i need pick up my kids! And have baby 8month! The factory usual no work 5 days just sometimes! I need advice if request by letter or not ? I dont have anyone for help me with look after my kids and my husband work in same place

    Editor: You could put in a request to work flexibly and your employer would be forced to give a good business reason for refusing your reuest and show that they had given it reasonable consideration.

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi i ask my boss for change me for part time and he said No and said my contract zero hours and this a factory not social service this not my problem if you have family!!!! I work for there 2 years, my maternity 39w end in 4 march and 52 in 4 june! My contract 0 hours full-time i ask for work tuesdays wednesdays and thursday 9h till 14h because i have 3 kids in fvll time school 10y 7y 5y i need pick up my kids! And have baby 8month! The factory usual no work 5 days just sometimes! I need advice if request by letter or not ? I dont have anyone for help me with look after my kids and my husband work in same place

    Editor: You could put in a request to work flexibly and your employer would be forced to give a good business reason for refusing your reuest and show that they had given it reasonable consideration.

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi i ask my boss for change me for part time and he said No and said my contract zero hours and this a factory not social service this not my problem if you have family!!!! I work for there 2 years, my maternity 39w end in 4 march and 52 in 4 june! My contract 0 hours full-time i ask for work tuesdays wednesdays and thursday 9h till 14h because i have 3 kids in fvll time school 10y 7y 5y i need pick up my kids! And have baby 8month! The factory usual no work 5 days just sometimes! I need advice if request by letter or not ? I dont have anyone for help me with look after my kids and my husband work in same place

    Editor: You could put in a request to work flexibly and your employer would be forced to give a good business reason for refusing your reuest and show that they had given it reasonable consideration.

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi I work for a very large company who offer flexible working hours. I ended up working for this company because there was a takeover. Before the takeover I used to work from home 2 days a week. Just before the tupee the old company said it would look better if everyone was in the office and my work from home had to stop. I felt that I did not have a reprehensive and went along with it. I am having the same issues of being exhausted as I did before the flexible working hours. I applied for FWH with the new company, but my manager rejected it saying it would be detrimental to the department. We all work remotely from our clients. I know now that I should have stood my grounds before the tupee.

    Editor: Have you appealed the decision on the grounds that you have been doing the work already from home with no detrimental effect?

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi I work for a very large company who offer flexible working hours. I ended up working for this company because there was a takeover. Before the takeover I used to work from home 2 days a week. Just before the tupee the old company said it would look better if everyone was in the office and my work from home had to stop. I felt that I did not have a reprehensive and went along with it. I am having the same issues of being exhausted as I did before the flexible working hours. I applied for FWH with the new company, but my manager rejected it saying it would be detrimental to the department. We all work remotely from our clients. I know now that I should have stood my grounds before the tupee.

    Editor: Have you appealed the decision on the grounds that you have been doing the work already from home with no detrimental effect?

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi I work for a very large company who offer flexible working hours. I ended up working for this company because there was a takeover. Before the takeover I used to work from home 2 days a week. Just before the tupee the old company said it would look better if everyone was in the office and my work from home had to stop. I felt that I did not have a reprehensive and went along with it. I am having the same issues of being exhausted as I did before the flexible working hours. I applied for FWH with the new company, but my manager rejected it saying it would be detrimental to the department. We all work remotely from our clients. I know now that I should have stood my grounds before the tupee.

    Editor: Have you appealed the decision on the grounds that you have been doing the work already from home with no detrimental effect?

  • Anonymous says:

    Can my employer allow a colleague to work from home after maternity leave but suggest that when I return I can't as our roles are different ( which is correct) or if you both work in the same team do the same rules apply?

    Editor: Employers would judge each request on its merits and they can turn down a request on one of eight grounds – see https://www.workingmums.co.uk/extending-flexible-working/. You could put in a request for flexible working and see how they justify it. If you do not think their reasons are justified according to the legislation you can appeal.

  • Anonymous says:

    Can my employer allow a colleague to work from home after maternity leave but suggest that when I return I can't as our roles are different ( which is correct) or if you both work in the same team do the same rules apply?

    Editor: Employers would judge each request on its merits and they can turn down a request on one of eight grounds.

    You could put in a request for flexible working and see how they justify it. If you do not think their reasons are justified according to the legislation you can appeal.

  • Anonymous says:

    Can my employer allow a colleague to work from home after maternity leave but suggest that when I return I can't as our roles are different ( which is correct) or if you both work in the same team do the same rules apply?

    Editor: Employers would judge each request on its merits and they can turn down a request on one of eight grounds.

    You could put in a request for flexible working and see how they justify it. If you do not think their reasons are justified according to the legislation you can appeal.

  • Anonymous says:

    I work 16 hours a week which includes the occasional Saturday, I am a single mum of two, I have been asked to work overtime after the store has closed which I can not do as I do not childcare on an evening do I have to do this overtime and if I refuse am I putting my job at risk.

    Editor: What does it say in your contract about overtime? See https://www.gov.uk/overtime-your-rights/overview

  • Anonymous says:

    I work 16 hours a week which includes the occasional Saturday, I am a single mum of two, I have been asked to work overtime after the store has closed which I can not do as I do not childcare on an evening do I have to do this overtime and if I refuse am I putting my job at risk.

    Editor: What does it say in your contract about overtime? See https://www.gov.uk/overtime-your-rights/overview

  • Anonymous says:

    I work 16 hours a week which includes the occasional Saturday, I am a single mum of two, I have been asked to work overtime after the store has closed which I can not do as I do not childcare on an evening do I have to do this overtime and if I refuse am I putting my job at risk.

    Editor: What does it say in your contract about overtime? See https://www.gov.uk/overtime-your-rights/overview

  • Anonymous says:

    I work 29 hours Monday-Thursday flexible working. I worked for a county council and was TUPED to a Health Authority a few years ago. The H A have now implemented a new Flexible working policy and we have been informed that the County Council TUPED policy is now void and we have to complete the HA request policy,can they do this under TUPED conditions…

    Editor: Our HR expert Sandra Beale says they can only change the terms for an ETO reason – see http://www.springhouselaw.com/glossary/eto-reason/

  • Anonymous says:

    I work 29 hours Monday-Thursday flexible working. I worked for a county council and was TUPED to a Health Authority a few years ago. The H A have now implemented a new Flexible working policy and we have been informed that the County Council TUPED policy is now void and we have to complete the HA request policy,can they do this under TUPED conditions…

    Editor: Our HR expert Sandra Beale says they can only change the terms for an ETO reason – see http://www.springhouselaw.com/glossary/eto-reason/

  • Anonymous says:

    I work 29 hours Monday-Thursday flexible working. I worked for a county council and was TUPED to a Health Authority a few years ago. The H A have now implemented a new Flexible working policy and we have been informed that the County Council TUPED policy is now void and we have to complete the HA request policy,can they do this under TUPED conditions…

    Editor: Our HR expert Sandra Beale says they can only change the terms for an ETO reason – see http://www.springhouselaw.com/glossary/eto-reason/

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi, I have been working as a healthcare support worker for the past 3 years working mon-fri (4 days) and I have now been told that we will be working a minimum of two weekends a month, I have two children and no child care facilities at weekends, when I mentioned this to HR I was basically told that I would be expected to work at least 1, and also told I could use my statutory right to apply for flexible working but then it was insinuated that this would make any difference! Where do I stand and what happens if I apply and they refuse and I don't have anyone to look after my kids. My husband works in retail as a manager and works every weekend (unless he is on annual leave). Any help would be appreciated

    Editor: Could you write via our Advice & Support/Q & A page box so we can follow up with any supplementary questions? What does your contract say about changing your hours? Have you been consulted about the changes? It is still worth applying for flexible working as if they automatically refuse it without giving it due consideration they will be going against the legislation and would be open to appeals and to claims of discrimination due to the childcare issue etc.

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi, I have been working as a healthcare support worker for the past 3 years working mon-fri (4 days) and I have now been told that we will be working a minimum of two weekends a month, I have two children and no child care facilities at weekends, when I mentioned this to HR I was basically told that I would be expected to work at least 1, and also told I could use my statutory right to apply for flexible working but then it was insinuated that this would make any difference! Where do I stand and what happens if I apply and they refuse and I don't have anyone to look after my kids. My husband works in retail as a manager and works every weekend (unless he is on annual leave). Any help would be appreciated

    Editor: Could you write via our Advice & Support/Q & A page box so we can follow up with any supplementary questions? What does your contract say about changing your hours? Have you been consulted about the changes? It is still worth applying for flexible working as if they automatically refuse it without giving it due consideration they will be going against the legislation and would be open to appeals and to claims of discrimination due to the childcare issue etc.

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi, I have been working as a healthcare support worker for the past 3 years working mon-fri (4 days) and I have now been told that we will be working a minimum of two weekends a month, I have two children and no child care facilities at weekends, when I mentioned this to HR I was basically told that I would be expected to work at least 1, and also told I could use my statutory right to apply for flexible working but then it was insinuated that this would make any difference! Where do I stand and what happens if I apply and they refuse and I don't have anyone to look after my kids. My husband works in retail as a manager and works every weekend (unless he is on annual leave). Any help would be appreciated

    Editor: Could you write via our Advice & Support/Q & A page box so we can follow up with any supplementary questions? What does your contract say about changing your hours? Have you been consulted about the changes? It is still worth applying for flexible working as if they automatically refuse it without giving it due consideration they will be going against the legislation and would be open to appeals and to claims of discrimination due to the childcare issue etc.

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi I work for the NHS Scotland sharing the same post with a colleague who is on maternity leave. for the last year and half I have worked Thursdays and Fridays> My manager came up to me and said that my colleague may want to change the her working days when she comes back. Can I be made to change my working days to accommodate.

    Editor: Your terms and conditions can only be changed in consultation with you – see https://www.gov.uk/your-employment-contract-how-it-can-be-changed/getting-agreement

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi I work for the NHS Scotland sharing the same post with a colleague who is on maternity leave. for the last year and half I have worked Thursdays and Fridays> My manager came up to me and said that my colleague may want to change the her working days when she comes back. Can I be made to change my working days to accommodate.

    Editor: Your terms and conditions can only be changed in consultation with you – see https://www.gov.uk/your-employment-contract-how-it-can-be-changed/getting-agreement

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi I work for the NHS Scotland sharing the same post with a colleague who is on maternity leave. for the last year and half I have worked Thursdays and Fridays> My manager came up to me and said that my colleague may want to change the her working days when she comes back. Can I be made to change my working days to accommodate.

    Editor: Your terms and conditions can only be changed in consultation with you – see https://www.gov.uk/your-employment-contract-how-it-can-be-changed/getting-agreement

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi i am a working mother. I have 3 childrens altogether. My oldest child is 7, and second youngest is 3years and the youngest is 1 years old. I want some advive i need it soon. After i had my youngest in 2013, i tooke my full merternity up until 52 weeks. After that i requested my employer for futhur more extention leave due to child care issue. He allowed me futhur more 5 month un paid leave up untill the end of january 2015. I am know soon due back to work but i have to young childrens under the age of five. I cant afford to pay child minders and cant leave them any where other than my mums.She is my only trust worthy and relibale person to leave them with.However my mum suffers of very seiver aurthrites. Shes only is willing to look after one and not too as this gets too much for her. So i wanted to know due to my circumstances will it be a good idea to ask my employer for futhur more extention most lickley until september 2015 with out loosing my job.This is because by september my second child should get a place in school which means i can only leave my yongest child at mums.Too of my childrens can be at school with me.please get back to me soon because i have short time and i need to se my employer soon.

    Editor: Legally, your employer would not have to agree to any extension, but you could try to negotiate this. However, is there another way round this? If you cannot afford two lots of childcare, could you afford childcare for your 3 year old? The government allows 15 free hours of childcare for 3-4 year olds and you may also be entitled to other benefits, such as Child Tax Credit. You can check your entitlement via http://www.turn2us.org.uk

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi i am a working mother. I have 3 childrens altogether. My oldest child is 7, and second youngest is 3years and the youngest is 1 years old. I want some advive i need it soon. After i had my youngest in 2013, i tooke my full merternity up until 52 weeks. After that i requested my employer for futhur more extention leave due to child care issue. He allowed me futhur more 5 month un paid leave up untill the end of january 2015. I am know soon due back to work but i have to young childrens under the age of five. I cant afford to pay child minders and cant leave them any where other than my mums.She is my only trust worthy and relibale person to leave them with.However my mum suffers of very seiver aurthrites. Shes only is willing to look after one and not too as this gets too much for her. So i wanted to know due to my circumstances will it be a good idea to ask my employer for futhur more extention most lickley until september 2015 with out loosing my job.This is because by september my second child should get a place in school which means i can only leave my yongest child at mums.Too of my childrens can be at school with me.please get back to me soon because i have short time and i need to se my employer soon.

    Editor: Legally, your employer would not have to agree to any extension, but you could try to negotiate this. However, is there another way round this? If you cannot afford two lots of childcare, could you afford childcare for your 3 year old? The government allows 15 free hours of childcare for 3-4 year olds and you may also be entitled to other benefits, such as Child Tax Credit. You can check your entitlement via http://www.turn2us.org.uk

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi i am a working mother. I have 3 childrens altogether. My oldest child is 7, and second youngest is 3years and the youngest is 1 years old. I want some advive i need it soon. After i had my youngest in 2013, i tooke my full merternity up until 52 weeks. After that i requested my employer for futhur more extention leave due to child care issue. He allowed me futhur more 5 month un paid leave up untill the end of january 2015. I am know soon due back to work but i have to young childrens under the age of five. I cant afford to pay child minders and cant leave them any where other than my mums.She is my only trust worthy and relibale person to leave them with.However my mum suffers of very seiver aurthrites. Shes only is willing to look after one and not too as this gets too much for her. So i wanted to know due to my circumstances will it be a good idea to ask my employer for futhur more extention most lickley until september 2015 with out loosing my job.This is because by september my second child should get a place in school which means i can only leave my yongest child at mums.Too of my childrens can be at school with me.please get back to me soon because i have short time and i need to se my employer soon.

    Editor: Legally, your employer would not have to agree to any extension, but you could try to negotiate this. However, is there another way round this? If you cannot afford two lots of childcare, could you afford childcare for your 3 year old? The government allows 15 free hours of childcare for 3-4 year olds and you may also be entitled to other benefits, such as Child Tax Credit. You can check your entitlement via http://www.turn2us.org.uk

  • Anonymous says:

    Due to chronic ill-health and medical advice (my condition counts as a disability under the 2010 Act), I have requested part-time working going from 5 days to 3.5 days. My employer has orally informed me that they are willing to allow a temporary (three month) arrangement of one day and four half days. Orally, I have been informed that my request will negatively impact on the organisation's performance and quality. I have received no written offer.
    I have been advised by my medical support that the offer is pointless as it does not allow me to recover from the work period and will probably exacerbate my illness.
    How should I react?

    Editor: Under flexible working legislation, they should spell out the reasons for not granting your original request and are only allowed to turn it down on one of eight grounds. If you feel they have not given it due consideration, you can appeal. Have they said why they are offering your the half days rather than the 3.5 days? 

  • Anonymous says:

    Due to chronic ill-health and medical advice (my condition counts as a disability under the 2010 Act), I have requested part-time working going from 5 days to 3.5 days. My employer has orally informed me that they are willing to allow a temporary (three month) arrangement of one day and four half days. Orally, I have been informed that my request will negatively impact on the organisation's performance and quality. I have received no written offer.
    I have been advised by my medical support that the offer is pointless as it does not allow me to recover from the work period and will probably exacerbate my illness.
    How should I react?

    Editor: Under flexible working legislation, they should spell out the reasons for not granting your original request and are only allowed to turn it down on one of eight grounds. If you feel they have not given it due consideration, you can appeal.

  • Anonymous says:

    Due to chronic ill-health and medical advice (my condition counts as a disability under the 2010 Act), I have requested part-time working going from 5 days to 3.5 days. My employer has orally informed me that they are willing to allow a temporary (three month) arrangement of one day and four half days. Orally, I have been informed that my request will negatively impact on the organisation's performance and quality. I have received no written offer.
    I have been advised by my medical support that the offer is pointless as it does not allow me to recover from the work period and will probably exacerbate my illness.
    How should I react?

  • Anonymous says:

    I have asked for a reduction of my full time (37.5) hrs to 30 hrs per week due to ill health and childcare issues. Following a stroke last year, I am registered disabled and I feel the demand of a full time post is far too much for me. To make matters worse, my childminder has moved away and a replacement is impossible to come by where we live. I asked to work school hours only, but my request was (verbally) turned down. I expect the written refusal within the next few days). I have been told, working school time only would not meet service demands 🙁 I work for the NHS (school nursing).

    Editor: Your employer can turn down your request on any of eight grounds, but they must show they have given it due consideration. If you do not feel the reasons given are valid and show your employer has given due consideration to your request, you can appeal. See https://www.workingmums.co.uk/working-mums-magazine/hot-topics/7890872/extending-flexible-working.thtml

     

  • Anonymous says:

    I have asked for a reduction of my full time (37.5) hrs to 30 hrs per week due to ill health and childcare issues. Following a stroke last year, I am registered disabled and I feel the demand of a full time post is far too much for me. To make matters worse, my childminder has moved away and a replacement is impossible to come by where we live. I asked to work school hours only, but my request was (verbally) turned down. I expect the written refusal within the next few days). I have been told, working school time only would not meet service demands 🙁 I work for the NHS (school nursing).

    Editor: Your employer can turn down your request on any of eight grounds, but they must show they have given it due consideration. If you do not feel the reasons given are valid and show your employer has given due consideration to your request, you can appeal. See https://www.workingmums.co.uk/working-mums-magazine/hot-topics/7890872/extending-flexible-working.thtml

     

  • Anonymous says:

    I have asked for a reduction of my full time (37.5) hrs to 30 hrs per week due to ill health and childcare issues. Following a stroke last year, I am registered disabled and I feel the demand of a full time post is far too much for me. To make matters worse, my childminder has moved away and a replacement is impossible to come by where we live. I asked to work school hours only, but my request was (verbally) turned down. I expect the written refusal within the next few days). I have been told, working school time only would not meet service demands 🙁 I work for the NHS (school nursing).

    Editor: Your employer can turn down your request on any of eight grounds, but they must show they have given it due consideration. If you do not feel the reasons given are valid and show your employer has given due consideration to your request, you can appeal.

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi. I am a primary school teacher who went through the appeal process to Reduce hours from five days to two – part time/ job share. The governors upheld my appeal on the provision they found an appropriate job share. They have now informed me three weeks before I am due back that after advertising on two separate occasions they were unsuccessful. However they did not even hold interviews. My feeling is that this was their plan to still avoid me going part time. Can I appeal their decision still?

    Editor: Our employment lawyer Emma Wellard says: Typically, the appeal is the end of the internal process and there is no further right of appeal unless the school's policy expressly allows for one.  From what you say it sounds like the governors may have merely paid lip service to your request to work two days without making any real attempts to accommodate the request.  Having said that, it is difficult to advise you without knowing the content of the appeal outcome letter (if one was issued), whether genuine attempts were made to recruit someone, whether they received any promising applications from which they could take candidates through to interview and the timescales involved. 

    Generally, the obligations on employers with regard to flexible working requests received after 30 June 2014 are to:

    1. – deal with the request in a reasonable manner;
    2. – give you a decision within the decision period (generally 3 months from the date when the request is made); and
    3. – only refuse a request on one of the eight prescribed grounds. 
    4.  
    5. Failure on any of the above points would be grounds for an employment tribunal claim. If we assume that one of the prescribed grounds has been made out, it comes down to the other two points.  Unless you had agreed to extend the timeframe for completion of the process, by not providing you with a final decision until 3 weeks before your return, the school may well have gone beyond the 3 month decision period.  In terms of reasonableness, I do not consider it particularly reasonable of the school to advise you at this late stage of its final decision, as you will no doubt already have childcare in place.  There is also a question mark over whether the school has genuinely applied its mind to the proposal and given it proper consideration, as it should do.

      If you were to bring a claim under the flexible working legislation and were successful, a tribunal could order reconsideration of the request  and/or make an award of compensation (a maximum of 8 weeks’ pay).  Claims must be brought within 3 months of the flexible working decision being communicated to you and you would be required to go through the ACAS Early Conciliation process, whereby ACAS attempts to assist in reaching a settlement, before issuing your claim.

      It is quite common for tribunal claims under the flexible working legislation to include a claim of indirect sex discrimination.  This is where an employer applies a provision, criterion or practice (such as refusing part time working) to all staff, which has a detrimental effect on a particular group (i.e. women).  This may not be applicable in the circumstances and the school may be able to defend its position by having sought to recruit another part time employee to accommodate your request.  I suggest you take further advice if you wish to pursue such a claim.

      If you don't have any further right of appeal under the policy, then you could consider bringing a grievance under the school's internal grievance procedure before taking any action in an employment tribunal.

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi. I am a primary school teacher who went through the appeal process to Reduce hours from five days to two – part time/ job share. The governors upheld my appeal on the provision they found an appropriate job share. They have now informed me three weeks before I am due back that after advertising on two separate occasions they were unsuccessful. However they did not even hold interviews. My feeling is that this was their plan to still avoid me going part time. Can I appeal their decision still?

    Editor: Our employment lawyer Emma Wellard says: Typically, the appeal is the end of the internal process and there is no further right of appeal unless the school's policy expressly allows for one.  From what you say it sounds like the governors may have merely paid lip service to your request to work two days without making any real attempts to accommodate the request.  Having said that, it is difficult to advise you without knowing the content of the appeal outcome letter (if one was issued), whether genuine attempts were made to recruit someone, whether they received any promising applications from which they could take candidates through to interview and the timescales involved. 

    Generally, the obligations on employers with regard to flexible working requests received after 30 June 2014 are to:

    1. – deal with the request in a reasonable manner;
    2. – give you a decision within the decision period (generally 3 months from the date when the request is made); and
    3. – only refuse a request on one of the eight prescribed grounds. 
    4.  
    5. Failure on any of the above points would be grounds for an employment tribunal claim. If we assume that one of the prescribed grounds has been made out, it comes down to the other two points.  Unless you had agreed to extend the timeframe for completion of the process, by not providing you with a final decision until 3 weeks before your return, the school may well have gone beyond the 3 month decision period.  In terms of reasonableness, I do not consider it particularly reasonable of the school to advise you at this late stage of its final decision, as you will no doubt already have childcare in place.  There is also a question mark over whether the school has genuinely applied its mind to the proposal and given it proper consideration, as it should do.

      If you were to bring a claim under the flexible working legislation and were successful, a tribunal could order reconsideration of the request  and/or make an award of compensation (a maximum of 8 weeks’ pay).  Claims must be brought within 3 months of the flexible working decision being communicated to you and you would be required to go through the ACAS Early Conciliation process, whereby ACAS attempts to assist in reaching a settlement, before issuing your claim.

      It is quite common for tribunal claims under the flexible working legislation to include a claim of indirect sex discrimination.  This is where an employer applies a provision, criterion or practice (such as refusing part time working) to all staff, which has a detrimental effect on a particular group (i.e. women).  This may not be applicable in the circumstances and the school may be able to defend its position by having sought to recruit another part time employee to accommodate your request.  I suggest you take further advice if you wish to pursue such a claim.

      If you don't have any further right of appeal under the policy, then you could consider bringing a grievance under the school's internal grievance procedure before taking any action in an employment tribunal.

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi. I am a primary school teacher who went through the appeal process to Reduce hours from five days to two – part time/ job share. The governors upheld my appeal on the provision they found an appropriate job share. They have now informed me three weeks before I am due back that after advertising on two separate occasions they were unsuccessful. However they did not even hold interviews. My feeling is that this was their plan to still avoid me going part time. Can I appeal their decision still?

    Editor: Our employment lawyer Emma Wellard says: Typically, the appeal is the end of the internal process and there is no further right of appeal unless the school's policy expressly allows for one.  From what you say it sounds like the governors may have merely paid lip service to your request to work two days without making any real attempts to accommodate the request.  Having said that, it is difficult to advise you without knowing the content of the appeal outcome letter (if one was issued), whether genuine attempts were made to recruit someone, whether they received any promising applications from which they could take candidates through to interview and the timescales involved. 

    Generally, the obligations on employers with regard to flexible working requests received after 30 June 2014 are to:

    1. – deal with the request in a reasonable manner;
    2. – give you a decision within the decision period (generally 3 months from the date when the request is made); and
    3. – only refuse a request on one of the eight prescribed grounds. 
    4.  
    5. Failure on any of the above points would be grounds for an employment tribunal claim. If we assume that one of the prescribed grounds has been made out, it comes down to the other two points.  Unless you had agreed to extend the timeframe for completion of the process, by not providing you with a final decision until 3 weeks before your return, the school may well have gone beyond the 3 month decision period.  In terms of reasonableness, I do not consider it particularly reasonable of the school to advise you at this late stage of its final decision, as you will no doubt already have childcare in place.  There is also a question mark over whether the school has genuinely applied its mind to the proposal and given it proper consideration, as it should do.

      If you were to bring a claim under the flexible working legislation and were successful, a tribunal could order reconsideration of the request  and/or make an award of compensation (a maximum of 8 weeks’ pay).  Claims must be brought within 3 months of the flexible working decision being communicated to you and you would be required to go through the ACAS Early Conciliation process, whereby ACAS attempts to assist in reaching a settlement, before issuing your claim.

      It is quite common for tribunal claims under the flexible working legislation to include a claim of indirect sex discrimination.  This is where an employer applies a provision, criterion or practice (such as refusing part time working) to all staff, which has a detrimental effect on a particular group (i.e. women).  This may not be applicable in the circumstances and the school may be able to defend its position by having sought to recruit another part time employee to accommodate your request.  I suggest you take further advice if you wish to pursue such a claim.

      If you don't have any further right of appeal under the policy, then you could consider bringing a grievance under the school's internal grievance procedure before taking any action in an employment tribunal.

  • Anonymous says:

    My application for working flexible hours was granted in Sept 2012 with my current employer whom I have worked for, for 13 years. I reduced my working week from 35 too 25 hours (5 hours per day) to ensure I could take and collect my child from school. At the time I requested that a consideration be made for me to work the additional 2 hours at home; this was declined on the basis of my job grade. I recently have found out that a colleauge who is heavily pregnant, but in the same job grade, has been allowed to work from home. Surely this is discriminative???? I have asked for a meeting with my managment team which is due to take place on Friday to discuss further.

    Editor: You could certainly make another flexible working request to work from home as a year has passed since your last request. It would be a good idea to anticipate any possible reasons your employer might put forward for turning down the request so you can answer their concerns and you could suggest it for a trial period initially.

  • Anonymous says:

    My application for working flexible hours was granted in Sept 2012 with my current employer whom I have worked for, for 13 years. I reduced my working week from 35 too 25 hours (5 hours per day) to ensure I could take and collect my child from school. At the time I requested that a consideration be made for me to work the additional 2 hours at home; this was declined on the basis of my job grade. I recently have found out that a colleauge who is heavily pregnant, but in the same job grade, has been allowed to work from home. Surely this is discriminative???? I have asked for a meeting with my managment team which is due to take place on Friday to discuss further.

    Editor: You could certainly make another flexible working request to work from home as a year has passed since your last request. It would be a good idea to anticipate any possible reasons your employer might put forward for turning down the request so you can answer their concerns and you could suggest it for a trial period initially.

  • Anonymous says:

    My application for working flexible hours was granted in Sept 2012 with my current employer whom I have worked for, for 13 years. I reduced my working week from 35 too 25 hours (5 hours per day) to ensure I could take and collect my child from school. At the time I requested that a consideration be made for me to work the additional 2 hours at home; this was declined on the basis of my job grade. I recently have found out that a colleauge who is heavily pregnant, but in the same job grade, has been allowed to work from home. Surely this is discriminative???? I have asked for a meeting with my managment team which is due to take place on Friday to discuss further.

    Editor: You could certainly make another flexible working request to work from home as a year has passed since your last request. It would be a good idea to anticipate any possible reasons your employer might put forward for turning down the request so you can answer their concerns and you could suggest it for a trial period initially.

  • Anonymous says:

    I am on maternity leave n have requested to reduce from 5 to 3 days as per their policy. Was telephoned n basically told 2.5 days or 5 days as they say it will be easier to recruit the remaining days but not had a meeting to discuss. I have asked for a meeting which is Monday but what do they need to demonstrate to show it will be difficult to recruit remaining hours? Also they have not followed their policy?

    Editor: The following sets out the rules regarding the new legislation on flexible working. They can only turn down the request on one of eight grounds. They would have to demonstrate that they have given your request reasonable consideration and looked at ways of meeting the request.

  • Anonymous says:

    I am on maternity leave n have requested to reduce from 5 to 3 days as per their policy. Was telephoned n basically told 2.5 days or 5 days as they say it will be easier to recruit the remaining days but not had a meeting to discuss. I have asked for a meeting which is Monday but what do they need to demonstrate to show it will be difficult to recruit remaining hours? Also they have not followed their policy?

  • Anonymous says:

    I am on maternity leave n have requested to reduce from 5 to 3 days as per their policy. Was telephoned n basically told 2.5 days or 5 days as they say it will be easier to recruit the remaining days but not had a meeting to discuss. I have asked for a meeting which is Monday but what do they need to demonstrate to show it will be difficult to recruit remaining hours? Also they have not followed their policy?

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi, I am currently on mat leave, due back in Jan. I had a meeting last week and have been given an option of demotion on my return (no change to my salary) as its 'easier to grant the flexible hoursfor that role' so basically pushing me for this rather than keeping my current role as its 'harder to grant'. But also stating that if I return to my old position that I would go on a performance plan as I was put on reduced tasks prior to my mat leave. I had a bad pregnancy and a very stressfull job. The tasks I completed have been passed to two seperate employees since. Where do I stand?

    Editor: You are entitled to return to your original job after ordinary maternity leave and to the same job or a reasonable alternative after additional maternity leave. Have you applied for flexible working formally? If so, they will have to give a reason for turning down your request in your original job. You do not have to accept the demotion.

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi, I am currently on mat leave, due back in Jan. I had a meeting last week and have been given an option of demotion on my return (no change to my salary) as its 'easier to grant the flexible hoursfor that role' so basically pushing me for this rather than keeping my current role as its 'harder to grant'. But also stating that if I return to my old position that I would go on a performance plan as I was put on reduced tasks prior to my mat leave. I had a bad pregnancy and a very stressfull job. The tasks I completed have been passed to two seperate employees since. Where do I stand?

    Editor: You are entitled to return to your original job after ordinary maternity leave and to the same job or a reasonable alternative after additional maternity leave. Have you applied for flexible working formally? If so, they will have to give a reason for turning down your request in your original job. You do not have to accept the demotion. See https://www.workingmums.co.uk/do-you-know-your-maternity-rights/

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi, I am currently on mat leave, due back in Jan. I had a meeting last week and have been given an option of demotion on my return (no change to my salary) as its 'easier to grant the flexible hoursfor that role' so basically pushing me for this rather than keeping my current role as its 'harder to grant'. But also stating that if I return to my old position that I would go on a performance plan as I was put on reduced tasks prior to my mat leave. I had a bad pregnancy and a very stressfull job. The tasks I completed have been passed to two seperate employees since. Where do I stand?

    Editor: You are entitled to return to your original job after ordinary maternity leave and to the same job or a reasonable alternative after additional maternity leave. Have you applied for flexible working formally? If so, they will have to give a reason for turning down your request in your original job. You do not have to accept the demotion.

  • Anonymous says:

    Thanks and i will have to find that out as I was not given a contract although I signed a contract with not much information on it.

    Editor: Every employee is legally entitled to a written contract so you should follow this up.

  • Anonymous says:

    Thanks and i will have to find that out as I was not given a contract although I signed a contract with not much information on it.

    Editor: Every employee is legally entitled to a written contract so you should follow this up.

  • Anonymous says:

    Thanks and i will have to find that out as I was not given a contract although I signed a contract with not much information on it.

    Editor: Every employee is legally entitled to a written contract so you should follow this up.

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi, I work nights 4 nights a week and 7 hours a day which mostly falls into 8 to 10 hours a day. I chose Friday as my working night off.
    Currently I sometimes work on Friday's for overtime. Does my hour's or Friday that I work fall into time and a half for that's the reason I work on Friday's when I am able.

    Editor: Does your contract state that you will be paid time and a half for overtime and what does your contract say about your hours?

     

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi, I work nights 4 nights a week and 7 hours a day which mostly falls into 8 to 10 hours a day. I chose Friday as my working night off.
    Currently I sometimes work on Friday's for overtime. Does my hour's or Friday that I work fall into time and a half for that's the reason I work on Friday's when I am able.

    Editor: Does your contract state that you will be paid time and a half for overtime and what does your contract say about your hours?

     

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi, I work nights 4 nights a week and 7 hours a day which mostly falls into 8 to 10 hours a day. I chose Friday as my working night off.
    Currently I sometimes work on Friday's for overtime. Does my hour's or Friday that I work fall into time and a half for that's the reason I work on Friday's when I am able.

    Editor: Does your contract state that you will be paid time and a half for overtime and what does your contract say about your hours?

     

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi I have been working for the nhs in the same job for 19 years. 3 years ago I had a child and reduced my hours to 33 so I have a day off. My work has now decided it wants to put people on shifts so we either stay early (7:30am) or finish late (7:00pm). My problem is my child's nursery doesn't open until half 7 and closes at 6.I don't drive and my partner stays and finishes after these hours. All my work days is its tough and I will have to find somewhere that is open. She has been at this nursery for over 2 years and stays school next year so even if I could find somewhere else open I really don't want to move her. Where do I stand on this ? Thanks

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi I have been working for the nhs in the same job for 19 years. 3 years ago I had a child and reduced my hours to 33 so I have a day off. My work has now decided it wants to put people on shifts so we either stay early (7:30am) or finish late (7:00pm). My problem is my child's nursery doesn't open until half 7 and closes at 6.I don't drive and my partner stays and finishes after these hours. All my work days is its tough and I will have to find somewhere that is open. She has been at this nursery for over 2 years and stays school next year so even if I could find somewhere else open I really don't want to move her. Where do I stand on this ? Thanks

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi I have been working for the nhs in the same job for 19 years. 3 years ago I had a child and reduced my hours to 33 so I have a day off. My work has now decided it wants to put people on shifts so we either stay early (7:30am) or finish late (7:00pm). My problem is my child's nursery doesn't open until half 7 and closes at 6.I don't drive and my partner stays and finishes after these hours. All my work days is its tough and I will have to find somewhere that is open. She has been at this nursery for over 2 years and stays school next year so even if I could find somewhere else open I really don't want to move her. Where do I stand on this ? Thanks

    Editor: see https://www.workingmums.co.uk/advice-and-support/all/page_2/6330928/employer-wants-to-change-shift-patterns-ask-the-expert.thtml

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi I have had my flexible working request refused which I have appealed. I have been asked to go in for my appeal meeting. I just wanted to know if I can take my husband wih me as a witness. I have tea that I can take a colleague or a trade union member. I am not wih a union and I don't want to put anyone in a difficult position by bringing them into my meeting so I had hoped my husband could come. Is this possible? Is it with asking?

    Editor: You could always ask. Employees do not have a statutory right to be accompanied by a colleague or anyone else, but Acas says it is good practice to allow a colleague to be there.

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi I have had my flexible working request refused which I have appealed. I have been asked to go in for my appeal meeting. I just wanted to know if I can take my husband wih me as a witness. I have tea that I can take a colleague or a trade union member. I am not wih a union and I don't want to put anyone in a difficult position by bringing them into my meeting so I had hoped my husband could come. Is this possible? Is it with asking?

    Editor: You could always ask. Employees do not have a statutory right to be accompanied by a colleague or anyone else, but Acas says it is good practice to allow a colleague to be there.

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi I have had my flexible working request refused which I have appealed. I have been asked to go in for my appeal meeting. I just wanted to know if I can take my husband wih me as a witness. I have tea that I can take a colleague or a trade union member. I am not wih a union and I don't want to put anyone in a difficult position by bringing them into my meeting so I had hoped my husband could come. Is this possible? Is it with asking?

    Editor: You could always ask. Employees do not have a statutory right to be accompanied by a colleague or anyone else, but Acas says it is good practice to allow a colleague to be there.

  • Anonymous says:

    I am returning to work after maternity leave on a part time basis (24hrs). I was previously full time before leaving to have my baby (40 hrs). They have agreed to the hours and shifts I want but in my letter I received from my employer confirming this, one part reads… "If your new working pattern does not meet the needs of the business we reserve the right at any time to request you revert to your previous pattern of working and your original terms and conditions."
    Is this correct? Can they do that? Shouldn't I be given a new contract stating my role and working hours? Also in the letter it says they have enclosed a PERS 131 form but I have nothing. What is this? And do I need it? Thanks

    Editor: Have you gone through the formal flexible working process – see https://www.gov.uk/flexible-working/applying-for-flexible-working? If so, this represents a permanent change to your terms and conditions and they could only alter it by obtaining your agreement. I think PERS 131 is an internal form so you would have to check this with your organisation.

  • Anonymous says:

    I am returning to work after maternity leave on a part time basis (24hrs). I was previously full time before leaving to have my baby (40 hrs). They have agreed to the hours and shifts I want but in my letter I received from my employer confirming this, one part reads… "If your new working pattern does not meet the needs of the business we reserve the right at any time to request you revert to your previous pattern of working and your original terms and conditions."
    Is this correct? Can they do that? Shouldn't I be given a new contract stating my role and working hours? Also in the letter it says they have enclosed a PERS 131 form but I have nothing. What is this? And do I need it? Thanks

    Editor: Have you gone through the formal flexible working process – see https://www.gov.uk/flexible-working/applying-for-flexible-working? If so, this represents a permanent change to your terms and conditions and they could only alter it by obtaining your agreement. I think PERS 131 is an internal form so you would have to check this with your organisation.

  • Anonymous says:

    I am returning to work after maternity leave on a part time basis (24hrs). I was previously full time before leaving to have my baby (40 hrs). They have agreed to the hours and shifts I want but in my letter I received from my employer confirming this, one part reads… "If your new working pattern does not meet the needs of the business we reserve the right at any time to request you revert to your previous pattern of working and your original terms and conditions."
    Is this correct? Can they do that? Shouldn't I be given a new contract stating my role and working hours? Also in the letter it says they have enclosed a PERS 131 form but I have nothing. What is this? And do I need it? Thanks

    Editor: Have you gone through the formal flexible working process – see https://www.gov.uk/flexible-working/applying-for-flexible-working? If so, this represents a permanent change to your terms and conditions and they could only alter it by obtaining your agreement. I think PERS 131 is an internal form so you would have to check this with your organisation.

  • Anonymous says:

    On flexible hours I work in a call centre which operates Mon-Fri-8am-8pm and both weekend days over a shift pattern. Can I ask for flexible hours to only do 9-5 mon -fri as I cannot get a baby sitter for the weekends. this will leave others in the office having to work more weekends and late's. thanks

    Editor: You can certainly request this under flexible working legislation for childcare reasons, but your employer could turn it down on one of eight grounds specified in the article above. Have you been doing this shift for a while or have you just gone back after maternity leave? Or have you had a breakdown in childcare cover? It would make your case stronger if you could show you have thought about the impact on work and how this might be addressed. Do other people in the call centre, for instance, work fixed days due to childcare reasons? Could you suggest a job share with another colleague who is willing to work evenings and weekends?

  • Anonymous says:

    On flexible hours I work in a call centre which operates Mon-Fri-8am-8pm and both weekend days over a shift pattern. Can I ask for flexible hours to only do 9-5 mon -fri as I cannot get a baby sitter for the weekends. this will leave others in the office having to work more weekends and late's. thanks

    Editor: You can certainly request this under flexible working legislation for childcare reasons, but your employer could turn it down on one of eight grounds specified in the article above. Have you been doing this shift for a while or have you just gone back after maternity leave? Or have you had a breakdown in childcare cover? It would make your case stronger if you could show you have thought about the impact on work and how this might be addressed. Do other people in the call centre, for instance, work fixed days due to childcare reasons? Could you suggest a job share with another colleague who is willing to work evenings and weekends?

  • Anonymous says:

    On flexible hours I work in a call centre which operates Mon-Fri-8am-8pm and both weekend days over a shift pattern. Can I ask for flexible hours to only do 9-5 mon -fri as I cannot get a baby sitter for the weekends. this will leave others in the office having to work more weekends and late's. thanks

    Editor: You can certainly request this under flexible working legislation for childcare reasons, but your employer could turn it down on one of eight grounds specified in the article above. Have you been doing this shift for a while or have you just gone back after maternity leave? Or have you had a breakdown in childcare cover? It would make your case stronger if you could show you have thought about the impact on work and how this might be addressed. Do other people in the call centre, for instance, work fixed days due to childcare reasons? Could you suggest a job share with another colleague who is willing to work evenings and weekends?

  • Anonymous says:

    I am returning to work from maternity leave and i was working condensed hours (40hrs in 4 days)for 2 1/2 years. They have told me I have to reapply for these flexible hours when I was under the impression they were permanent. Could you give me some advice.

    Editor: If you applied for the change under flexible working legislation it is a permanent change to your terms and conditions and they would have to consult and gain your agreement if they want to change these.

  • Anonymous says:

    I am returning to work from maternity leave and i was working condensed hours (40hrs in 4 days)for 2 1/2 years. They have told me I have to reapply for these flexible hours when I was under the impression they were permanent. Could you give me some advice.

    Editor: If you applied for the change under flexible working legislation it is a permanent change to your terms and conditions and they would have to consult and gain your agreement if they want to change these.

  • Anonymous says:

    I am returning to work from maternity leave and i was working condensed hours (40hrs in 4 days)for 2 1/2 years. They have told me I have to reapply for these flexible hours when I was under the impression they were permanent. Could you give me some advice.

    Editor: If you applied for the change under flexible working legislation it is a permanent change to your terms and conditions and they would have to consult and gain your agreement if they want to change these.

  • Anonymous says:

    I am a bus driver and requesting instead of shift work which some duties can finish sometime after midnight,i am requesting I finish before 1630,which I have been doing for the pass two years,that was when my daughter who was 10 years old at the time was diagnosed as type 1 diabetics.
    I am a married man where my wife works part time and after work she needs to attend to her mum who only has a carer between certain times where my wife takes over in between ,so this really put a strain on my wife when our daughter was diagnosed.
    Now my manger is given me problems with regards to finishing time and what me to go back to my original shift contract .
    Who will look after my daughter after school has she needs to have dinner by 1730 and majority of childminders do not what to take responsibility .
    Just finding it hard to express to my employers that I really need to stick with my work schedule wich I have been doing since 2012.
    Can you give me a bit of advice
    Thang you

    Editor: You say you have been doing this pattern for two years. Was your work pattern changed on the understanding it would be temporary or was it under flexible working legislation? If the latter it is a permanent change to your terms and conditions and they would have to consult you and get your agreement if they want to change back to the original shift pattern.

  • Anonymous says:

    I am a bus driver and requesting instead of shift work which some duties can finish sometime after midnight,i am requesting I finish before 1630,which I have been doing for the pass two years,that was when my daughter who was 10 years old at the time was diagnosed as type 1 diabetics.
    I am a married man where my wife works part time and after work she needs to attend to her mum who only has a carer between certain times where my wife takes over in between ,so this really put a strain on my wife when our daughter was diagnosed.
    Now my manger is given me problems with regards to finishing time and what me to go back to my original shift contract .
    Who will look after my daughter after school has she needs to have dinner by 1730 and majority of childminders do not what to take responsibility .
    Just finding it hard to express to my employers that I really need to stick with my work schedule wich I have been doing since 2012.
    Can you give me a bit of advice
    Thang you

    Editor: You say you have been doing this pattern for two years. Was your work pattern changed on the understanding it would be temporary or was it under flexible working legislation? If the latter it is a permanent change to your terms and conditions and they would have to consult you and get your agreement if they want to change back to the original shift pattern.

  • Anonymous says:

    I am a bus driver and requesting instead of shift work which some duties can finish sometime after midnight,i am requesting I finish before 1630,which I have been doing for the pass two years,that was when my daughter who was 10 years old at the time was diagnosed as type 1 diabetics.
    I am a married man where my wife works part time and after work she needs to attend to her mum who only has a carer between certain times where my wife takes over in between ,so this really put a strain on my wife when our daughter was diagnosed.
    Now my manger is given me problems with regards to finishing time and what me to go back to my original shift contract .
    Who will look after my daughter after school has she needs to have dinner by 1730 and majority of childminders do not what to take responsibility .
    Just finding it hard to express to my employers that I really need to stick with my work schedule wich I have been doing since 2012.
    Can you give me a bit of advice
    Thang you

    Editor: You say you have been doing this pattern for two years. Was your work pattern changed on the understanding it would be temporary or was it under flexible working legislation? If the latter it is a permanent change to your terms and conditions and they would have to consult you and get your agreement if they want to change back to the original shift pattern.

  • Anonymous says:

    When I return to work after maternity leave and request flexible work for example completing my working hours over 3 full days instead of over 5 days can my employer cut my contracted hours down?

    Editor: Not without your consent. The flexible work process is often a negotiation between employee and employer. They do not have to agree compressed hours though if there is a good business reason not to.

  • Anonymous says:

    When I return to work after maternity leave and request flexible work for example completing my working hours over 3 full days instead of over 5 days can my employer cut my contracted hours down?

    Editor: Not without your consent. The flexible work process is often a negotiation between employee and employer. They do not have to agree compressed hours though if there is a good business reason not to.

  • Anonymous says:

    When I return to work after maternity leave and request flexible work for example completing my working hours over 3 full days instead of over 5 days can my employer cut my contracted hours down?

    Editor: Not without your consent. The flexible work process is often a negotiation between employee and employer. They do not have to agree compressed hours though if there is a good business reason not to.

  • Anonymous says:

    I applied for flexible working (3 day part time) after my maternity leave, the company considered my previous role not suitable and offered me a new position which deem able to fit my request of working 3 days. I accepted and have a 3 month trial period. From the first week I was expected to come in extra days, and throughout the first month, I was asked not only to go in extra days but also some nights and weekend. I am feeling under pressure to say yes to all and there were times when they only give me a day notice (which I refused in that instance) I do not feel that this role is at all suitable for part time ( I should point out that the person who I am taking over was a full time)
    Furthermore the work load are too intense I am not perform well as not enough training is given either. What should I do? I am exhausted from working all those hours when I know I can only cope with 3 days (that's why I applied!)

    Editor: What were the terms of the trial period? It should be as much for your as for the company. Talk to your manager and explain the situation and see if the workload can be reduced in any way so it is genuinely a part-time proposition. You should still have a right to return to your original job after the trial period.

  • Anonymous says:

    I applied for flexible working (3 day part time) after my maternity leave, the company considered my previous role not suitable and offered me a new position which deem able to fit my request of working 3 days. I accepted and have a 3 month trial period. From the first week I was expected to come in extra days, and throughout the first month, I was asked not only to go in extra days but also some nights and weekend. I am feeling under pressure to say yes to all and there were times when they only give me a day notice (which I refused in that instance) I do not feel that this role is at all suitable for part time ( I should point out that the person who I am taking over was a full time)
    Furthermore the work load are too intense I am not perform well as not enough training is given either. What should I do? I am exhausted from working all those hours when I know I can only cope with 3 days (that's why I applied!)

    Editor: What were the terms of the trial period? It should be as much for your as for the company. Talk to your manager and explain the situation and see if the workload can be reduced in any way so it is genuinely a part-time proposition. You should still have a right to return to your original job after the trial period.

  • Anonymous says:

    I applied for flexible working (3 day part time) after my maternity leave, the company considered my previous role not suitable and offered me a new position which deem able to fit my request of working 3 days. I accepted and have a 3 month trial period. From the first week I was expected to come in extra days, and throughout the first month, I was asked not only to go in extra days but also some nights and weekend. I am feeling under pressure to say yes to all and there were times when they only give me a day notice (which I refused in that instance) I do not feel that this role is at all suitable for part time ( I should point out that the person who I am taking over was a full time)
    Furthermore the work load are too intense I am not perform well as not enough training is given either. What should I do? I am exhausted from working all those hours when I know I can only cope with 3 days (that's why I applied!)

    Editor: What were the terms of the trial period? It should be as much for your as for the company. Talk to your manager and explain the situation and see if the workload can be reduced in any way so it is genuinely a part-time proposition. You should still have a right to return to your original job after the trial period.

  • Anonymous says:

    I have 4 children and returned to work last year full time. Since then me and my partner have dplit up andbi have sole responsibility for the children. My nursery costs for my 3 and 18 month old are really high. I am now in a situation where the person who was pickin up my 8 year old from school cant do it. As I can't afford to pay for anymore childcare I asked my manager if I could finish at 3 instead of 4 so I could collect him from school. He said no there and then. Saying who is going to cover for the hour a day I wouldn't be there. So he wouldn't consider it. I have subsequently found another job for 6 month secondment and he has told me that 'if you come back your job is full time not part time'. He has not considered my request at all. What should I do? I will be in the same boat in 6 months.

    Editor: Have you put in a flexible working request – see https://www.gov.uk/flexible-working/overview. If you do so your employer has to give your request due consideration. He cannot just say no and must show that he has given it reasonable thought. Plus he can only decline it based on eight grounds. It may be a good idea to consider a way round his potential objections. It is unclear what job you do and whether there might be a way round that extra hour such as working from home later, etc.

  • Anonymous says:

    I have 4 children and returned to work last year full time. Since then me and my partner have dplit up andbi have sole responsibility for the children. My nursery costs for my 3 and 18 month old are really high. I am now in a situation where the person who was pickin up my 8 year old from school cant do it. As I can't afford to pay for anymore childcare I asked my manager if I could finish at 3 instead of 4 so I could collect him from school. He said no there and then. Saying who is going to cover for the hour a day I wouldn't be there. So he wouldn't consider it. I have subsequently found another job for 6 month secondment and he has told me that 'if you come back your job is full time not part time'. He has not considered my request at all. What should I do? I will be in the same boat in 6 months.

    Editor: Have you put in a flexible working request – see https://www.gov.uk/flexible-working/overview. If you do so your employer has to give your request due consideration. He cannot just say no and must show that he has given it reasonable thought. Plus he can only decline it based on eight grounds. It may be a good idea to consider a way round his potential objections. It is unclear what job you do and whether there might be a way round that extra hour such as working from home later, etc.

  • Anonymous says:

    I have 4 children and returned to work last year full time. Since then me and my partner have dplit up andbi have sole responsibility for the children. My nursery costs for my 3 and 18 month old are really high. I am now in a situation where the person who was pickin up my 8 year old from school cant do it. As I can't afford to pay for anymore childcare I asked my manager if I could finish at 3 instead of 4 so I could collect him from school. He said no there and then. Saying who is going to cover for the hour a day I wouldn't be there. So he wouldn't consider it. I have subsequently found another job for 6 month secondment and he has told me that 'if you come back your job is full time not part time'. He has not considered my request at all. What should I do? I will be in the same boat in 6 months.

    Editor: Have you put in a flexible working request – see https://www.gov.uk/flexible-working/overview. If you do so your employer has to give your request due consideration. He cannot just say no and must show that he has given it reasonable thought. Plus he can only decline it based on eight grounds. It may be a good idea to consider a way round his potential objections. It is unclear what job you do and whether there might be a way round that extra hour such as working from home later, etc.

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi

    I submitted a flexible working request in August 2013 on my return from maternity leave. My child care arrangements are going to have to change due to my mother in law not being able to look after my daughter for one day,I've now been told that I can't put another form in because it's within 12 months. However now I'm stuck because I don't know what to do and don't have childcare for 1 day.can you please advise me .thanks

    Editor: It is correct that you can only put a new flexible work request one year or more after the first request. Can you negotiate with your manager over your childcare issues? You do not say how old your daughter is. If she is under five, you could access parental leave, but it is unpaid – see https://www.gov.uk/parental-leave. Please provide a bit more information.

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi

    I submitted a flexible working request in August 2013 on my return from maternity leave. My child care arrangements are going to have to change due to my mother in law not being able to look after my daughter for one day,I've now been told that I can't put another form in because it's within 12 months. However now I'm stuck because I don't know what to do and don't have childcare for 1 day.can you please advise me .thanks

    Editor: It is correct that you can only put a new flexible work request one year or more after the first request. Can you negotiate with your manager over your childcare issues? You do not say how old your daughter is. If she is under five, you could access parental leave, but it is unpaid – see https://www.gov.uk/parental-leave. Please provide a bit more information.

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi

    I submitted a flexible working request in August 2013 on my return from maternity leave. My child care arrangements are going to have to change due to my mother in law not being able to look after my daughter for one day,I've now been told that I can't put another form in because it's within 12 months. However now I'm stuck because I don't know what to do and don't have childcare for 1 day.can you please advise me .thanks

    Editor: It is correct that you can only put a new flexible work request one year or more after the first request. Can you negotiate with your manager over your childcare issues? You do not say how old your daughter is. If she is under five, you could access parental leave, but it is unpaid – see https://www.gov.uk/parental-leave. Please provide a bit more information.

  • Anonymous says:

    my contract states 24hrs flexible over 7 day period but when i started i told my boss i could only work certain night shifts which has been fine for 7 months. i have only done wed and thurs nights for 5 months now. my boss has left and new one started which says i have to work any night that she puts me down for. i have a piece of paper stating my avalibility signed by myself and previous manager. can the new manager change this.

    Editor: Our HR expert Sandra Beale says: If she has something in writing that supercedes the contract that shows agreement by both parties to working hours other than those in the contract, if the new boss wants to change those hours again then consultation and agreement must be sought.

  • Anonymous says:

    my contract states 24hrs flexible over 7 day period but when i started i told my boss i could only work certain night shifts which has been fine for 7 months. i have only done wed and thurs nights for 5 months now. my boss has left and new one started which says i have to work any night that she puts me down for. i have a piece of paper stating my avalibility signed by myself and previous manager. can the new manager change this.

    Editor: Our HR expert Sandra Beale says: If she has something in writing that supercedes the contract that shows agreement by both parties to working hours other than those in the contract, if the new boss wants to change those hours again then consultation and agreement must be sought.

  • Anonymous says:

    my contract states 24hrs flexible over 7 day period but when i started i told my boss i could only work certain night shifts which has been fine for 7 months. i have only done wed and thurs nights for 5 months now. my boss has left and new one started which says i have to work any night that she puts me down for. i have a piece of paper stating my avalibility signed by myself and previous manager. can the new manager change this.

    Editor: Our HR expert Sandra Beale says: If she has something in writing that supercedes the contract that shows agreement by both parties to working hours other than those in the contract, if the new boss wants to change those hours again then consultation and agreement must be sought.

  • Anonymous says:

    I have flexible working days for 5years my child is now in full time school will my flexible working days stop.

    Editor: A flexible work request is a permanent change to your terms and conditions so it cannot be changed without consultation with you and your agreement.

  • Anonymous says:

    I have flexible working days for 5years my child is now in full time school will my flexible working days stop.

    Editor: A flexible work request is a permanent change to your terms and conditions so it cannot be changed without consultation with you and your agreement.

  • Anonymous says:

    I have flexible working days for 5years my child is now in full time school will my flexible working days stop.

    Editor: A flexible work request is a permanent change to your terms and conditions so it cannot be changed without consultation with you and your agreement.

  • Anonymous says:

    The company have been working with client for over 10 years and they are a very large company. No reason just the client does not want it.

    The reason for the restructure is due to complains about two other receptionist , not my daughter. so looks like losing her job because of them.
    so can they just say no to job share even though it has been working for two years.

    Editor: She should ask for the business reason for doing this during the consultation. Her employer must use a fair and objective way of selecting job roles to make redundant, and tell her what it is. If she thinks she has been selected unfairly or herr employer has acted unfairly in other ways, she can normally appeal. If she is still not satisfied she can take her employer to a tribunal, but she should seek full legal advice before doing this.

  • Anonymous says:

    yes part of a restructure as the other receptionist not performing good, yes had consultation, as been told if you could work full time they will be a job for her, they are saying it is because the client does not want a job share

    so nothing wrong with her work and no work complains

    Editor: Has the company been working with the client for long? What reasons has the client given for not wanting a job share – do they say it is not working and why?

  • Anonymous says:

    so can they make her redunded??? just because the reason is the client does not want that posititon a job share, even though she has being doing it for 2 and ahalf years now, and work there 10 years in total.

    Editor: Is this part of a restructure? Is there a strong business reason why she is being made redundant? Has a proper consultation been followed where she can put her objections if she thinks she has been unfairly targeted for redundancy? 

  • Anonymous says:

    So are you saying they can? I cannot open the link above

    so can they make her redunded just becasuse the reason is the client does not want the position job shared? even though she has been doing it for 2 and half years and in total worked there 10 years

    Editor: https://www.workingmums.co.uk/maternity-and-redundancy-your-rights/

  • Anonymous says:

    My daughter has being working two days a week for 2 and half year now, with no complains, she works for a contractor.
    There has been some complains against the other tow receptionist and not my daughter, however this has resulted in them being asked by the client to re orangaise reception, resulting in them having to re apply for their jobs, my daughter has been told she cannot reply for the job and will lose her job as the client does not want a job share on reception, can they do this? she is losing her job as a result of others and no fault of hers.

    Editor: The following should help - https://www.workingmums.co.uk/advice-and-support/career-toolkit/7681517/your-rights-on-redundancy.thtml. 

  • Anonymous says:

    The company have been working with client for over 10 years and they are a very large company. No reason just the client does not want it.

    The reason for the restructure is due to complains about two other receptionist , not my daughter. so looks like losing her job because of them.
    so can they just say no to job share even though it has been working for two years.

    Editor: She should ask for the business reason for doing this during the consultation. Her employer must use a fair and objective way of selecting job roles to make redundant, and tell her what it is. If she thinks she has been selected unfairly or herr employer has acted unfairly in other ways, she can normally appeal. If she is still not satisfied she can take her employer to a tribunal, but she should seek full legal advice before doing this.

  • Anonymous says:

    yes part of a restructure as the other receptionist not performing good, yes had consultation, as been told if you could work full time they will be a job for her, they are saying it is because the client does not want a job share

    so nothing wrong with her work and no work complains

    Editor: Has the company been working with the client for long? What reasons has the client given for not wanting a job share – do they say it is not working and why?

  • Anonymous says:

    so can they make her redunded??? just because the reason is the client does not want that posititon a job share, even though she has being doing it for 2 and ahalf years now, and work there 10 years in total.

    Editor: Is this part of a restructure? Is there a strong business reason why she is being made redundant? Has a proper consultation been followed where she can put her objections if she thinks she has been unfairly targeted for redundancy? 

  • Anonymous says:

    So are you saying they can? I cannot open the link above

    so can they make her redunded just becasuse the reason is the client does not want the position job shared? even though she has been doing it for 2 and half years and in total worked there 10 years

  • Anonymous says:

    My daughter has being working two days a week for 2 and half year now, with no complains, she works for a contractor.
    There has been some complains against the other tow receptionist and not my daughter, however this has resulted in them being asked by the client to re orangaise reception, resulting in them having to re apply for their jobs, my daughter has been told she cannot reply for the job and will lose her job as the client does not want a job share on reception, can they do this? she is losing her job as a result of others and no fault of hers.

  • Anonymous says:

    The company have been working with client for over 10 years and they are a very large company. No reason just the client does not want it.

    The reason for the restructure is due to complains about two other receptionist , not my daughter. so looks like losing her job because of them.
    so can they just say no to job share even though it has been working for two years.

    Editor: She should ask for the business reason for doing this during the consultation. Her employer must use a fair and objective way of selecting job roles to make redundant, and tell her what it is. If she thinks she has been selected unfairly or herr employer has acted unfairly in other ways, she can normally appeal. If she is still not satisfied she can take her employer to a tribunal, but she should seek full legal advice before doing this.

  • Anonymous says:

    yes part of a restructure as the other receptionist not performing good, yes had consultation, as been told if you could work full time they will be a job for her, they are saying it is because the client does not want a job share

    so nothing wrong with her work and no work complains

    Editor: Has the company been working with the client for long? What reasons has the client given for not wanting a job share – do they say it is not working and why?

  • Anonymous says:

    so can they make her redunded??? just because the reason is the client does not want that posititon a job share, even though she has being doing it for 2 and ahalf years now, and work there 10 years in total.

    Editor: Is this part of a restructure? Is there a strong business reason why she is being made redundant? Has a proper consultation been followed where she can put her objections if she thinks she has been unfairly targeted for redundancy? 

  • Anonymous says:

    So are you saying they can? I cannot open the link above

    so can they make her redunded just becasuse the reason is the client does not want the position job shared? even though she has been doing it for 2 and half years and in total worked there 10 years

  • Anonymous says:

    My daughter has being working two days a week for 2 and half year now, with no complains, she works for a contractor.
    There has been some complains against the other tow receptionist and not my daughter, however this has resulted in them being asked by the client to re orangaise reception, resulting in them having to re apply for their jobs, my daughter has been told she cannot reply for the job and will lose her job as the client does not want a job share on reception, can they do this? she is losing her job as a result of others and no fault of hers.

    Editor: The following should help - https://www.workingmums.co.uk/advice-and-support/career-toolkit/7681517/your-rights-on-redundancy.thtml. 

  • Anonymous says:

    I am in the middle of a flexible working request process on return from maternity leave. My manager has previously mentioned that my old full time role is available to me but they are trying to sort out a job share for me. The 14days after the meeting runs out this Tuesday, but my manager called to ask for an extension for a week to see of they can get the job share for me, however she has said the job share is still not guaranteed. My old full time role that is available is very similar to another role which is currently being done as a job share, and they have just made another similar role which was full time into a job share.

    If I ask if my old full time role could be done as a job share, would they have to grant it as there is a precedent already? I work for a very large well known company who say they are in support of flexible working.

    Editor: They would not have to give you a job share just because they have done it before [there may, for instance, we problems finding a job share – it sounds as if they are trying to do so though], but failure to do so might be a factor to take into account for any appeal. 

  • Anonymous says:

    I am in the middle of a flexible working request process on return from maternity leave. My manager has previously mentioned that my old full time role is available to me but they are trying to sort out a job share for me. The 14days after the meeting runs out this Tuesday, but my manager called to ask for an extension for a week to see of they can get the job share for me, however she has said the job share is still not guaranteed. My old full time role that is available is very similar to another role which is currently being done as a job share, and they have just made another similar role which was full time into a job share.

    If I ask if my old full time role could be done as a job share, would they have to grant it as there is a precedent already? I work for a very large well known company who say they are in support of flexible working.

    Editor: They would not have to give you a job share just because they have done it before [there may, for instance, we problems finding a job share – it sounds as if they are trying to do so though], but failure to do so might be a factor to take into account for any appeal. 

  • Anonymous says:

    I am in the middle of a flexible working request process on return from maternity leave. My manager has previously mentioned that my old full time role is available to me but they are trying to sort out a job share for me. The 14days after the meeting runs out this Tuesday, but my manager called to ask for an extension for a week to see of they can get the job share for me, however she has said the job share is still not guaranteed. My old full time role that is available is very similar to another role which is currently being done as a job share, and they have just made another similar role which was full time into a job share.

    If I ask if my old full time role could be done as a job share, would they have to grant it as there is a precedent already? I work for a very large well known company who say they are in support of flexible working.

    Editor: They would not have to give you a job share just because they have done it before [there may, for instance, we problems finding a job share – it sounds as if they are trying to do so though], but failure to do so might be a factor to take into account for any appeal. 

  • Anonymous says:

    My flexible working request has been declined due to unable to meet customer demand and structural changes within the business. I am currently on a 45 consultation period as the business is cutting the workforce by 30% due to lack of work. Can they reject my request on these grounds? Thank you.

    Editor: Have they explained these reasons? These are valid reasons for turning down a request, but it depends whether you believe they have given your request due consideration or just used these reasons to dismiss your request out of hand. Do you feel these reasons are justifiable? If not, you can appeal, but try to think of this from your employer's perspective and address their concerns.

  • Anonymous says:

    My flexible working request has been declined due to unable to meet customer demand and structural changes within the business. I am currently on a 45 consultation period as the business is cutting the workforce by 30% due to lack of work. Can they reject my request on these grounds? Thank you.

    Editor: Have they explained these reasons? These are valid reasons for turning down a request, but it depends whether you believe they have given your request due consideration or just used these reasons to dismiss your request out of hand. Do you feel these reasons are justifiable? If not, you can appeal, but try to think of this from your employer's perspective and address their concerns.

  • Anonymous says:

    My flexible working request has been declined due to unable to meet customer demand and structural changes within the business. I am currently on a 45 consultation period as the business is cutting the workforce by 30% due to lack of work. Can they reject my request on these grounds? Thank you.

    Editor: Have they explained these reasons? These are valid reasons for turning down a request, but it depends whether you believe they have given your request due consideration or just used these reasons to dismiss your request out of hand. Do you feel these reasons are justifiable? If not, you can appeal, but try to think of this from your employer's perspective and address their concerns.

  • Anonymous says:

    I have worked for my company nearly seven years. I had one child three years ago and made a flexible working request to reduce my hours from 39 to 30 and this was declined so I went back to work full time. Since this time two other managers have returned from maternity leave on reduced hours. I am currently on maternity leave. When I fell pregnant I informed my line manager that when I returned I would be requesting flexible working hours to 30 Ober a four day week she verbally felt this would be ok. I have put in my request had my meeting and been declined for the following reasons 1. The detrimental impact on quality and performance of the provision which in turn will have an effect on the departments ability to implement the planned improvements to the service. 2. The impact on the existing staff team who require consistency with regard to leadership and management. I am the manager and have a deputy and team leader. I work hands on one day so my request would not effect management time.

    Editor: Have they given a detailed breakdown of these two points? Do you feel they have given your request due consideration? You could appeal on the grounds that they have not given due consideration, but you should attempt to address the two points they have made and suggest potential solutions, for instance, could you be on call in case of an emergency for the second one? You could also argue that if you were sick, your deputy would have to step in. The flexible working process is a negotiation and so taking into account their concerns and finding ways around them, or offering a trial period, is a good way forward.

  • Anonymous says:

    I have worked for my company nearly seven years. I had one child three years ago and made a flexible working request to reduce my hours from 39 to 30 and this was declined so I went back to work full time. Since this time two other managers have returned from maternity leave on reduced hours. I am currently on maternity leave. When I fell pregnant I informed my line manager that when I returned I would be requesting flexible working hours to 30 Ober a four day week she verbally felt this would be ok. I have put in my request had my meeting and been declined for the following reasons 1. The detrimental impact on quality and performance of the provision which in turn will have an effect on the departments ability to implement the planned improvements to the service. 2. The impact on the existing staff team who require consistency with regard to leadership and management. I am the manager and have a deputy and team leader. I work hands on one day so my request would not effect management time.

    Editor: Have they given a detailed breakdown of these two points? Do you feel they have given your request due consideration? You could appeal on the grounds that they have not given due consideration, but you should attempt to address the two points they have made and suggest potential solutions, for instance, could you be on call in case of an emergency for the second one? You could also argue that if you were sick, your deputy would have to step in. The flexible working process is a negotiation and so taking into account their concerns and finding ways around them, or offering a trial period, is a good way forward.

  • Anonymous says:

    I have worked for my company nearly seven years. I had one child three years ago and made a flexible working request to reduce my hours from 39 to 30 and this was declined so I went back to work full time. Since this time two other managers have returned from maternity leave on reduced hours. I am currently on maternity leave. When I fell pregnant I informed my line manager that when I returned I would be requesting flexible working hours to 30 Ober a four day week she verbally felt this would be ok. I have put in my request had my meeting and been declined for the following reasons 1. The detrimental impact on quality and performance of the provision which in turn will have an effect on the departments ability to implement the planned improvements to the service. 2. The impact on the existing staff team who require consistency with regard to leadership and management. I am the manager and have a deputy and team leader. I work hands on one day so my request would not effect management time.

    Editor: Have they given a detailed breakdown of these two points? Do you feel they have given your request due consideration? You could appeal on the grounds that they have not given due consideration, but you should attempt to address the two points they have made and suggest potential solutions, for instance, could you be on call in case of an emergency for the second one? You could also argue that if you were sick, your deputy would have to step in. The flexible working process is a negotiation and so taking into account their concerns and finding ways around them, or offering a trial period, is a good way forward.

  • Anonymous says:

    I had an verbal arrangement with my employer to do reduced hours on a trial basis they have now said this is not working and I have to do my contracted hours – does it matter that I have been doing the reduced hours for 3 months ? My contract was not changed ? Thanks.

    Editor: If it is a trial it is not a permanent change to your contract. Does it say in the terms of your trial [or was it agreed] that the trial would be for you and your manager to see if it worked? On what basis are they saying it doesn't work? You could appeal against the decision if you feel, for instance, that they were never really intending that it should work.

  • Anonymous says:

    I had an verbal arrangement with my employer to do reduced hours on a trial basis they have now said this is not working and I have to do my contracted hours – does it matter that I have been doing the reduced hours for 3 months ? My contract was not changed ? Thanks.

    Editor: If it is a trial it is not a permanent change to your contract. Does it say in the terms of your trial [or was it agreed] that the trial would be for you and your manager to see if it worked? On what basis are they saying it doesn't work? You could appeal against the decision if you feel, for instance, that they were never really intending that it should work.

  • Anonymous says:

    I had an verbal arrangement with my employer to do reduced hours on a trial basis they have now said this is not working and I have to do my contracted hours – does it matter that I have been doing the reduced hours for 3 months ? My contract was not changed ? Thanks.

    Editor: If it is a trial it is not a permanent change to your contract. Does it say in the terms of your trial [or was it agreed] that the trial would be for you and your manager to see if it worked? On what basis are they saying it doesn't work? You could appeal against the decision if you feel, for instance, that they were never really intending that it should work.

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi. I work 16 hours a week and have done so for the past year and a half. Recently my employer tells me I have to start doing overtime which they know I cant so due to childcare issues. If I refuse they say I have to move to an 8 hour contract which is pointless. Can they do this?. Because of this I have decided to apply for flexible working, all I want is to stay at my 16hours instead of 16 hours plus overtime. Am I doing the right thing by applying for flexible working?
    Thanks

    Editor: Does it state in your contract that you can be required to do regular overtime? If not, adding more hours to your work is a change to your terms and conditions and can only be done in consultation with you and with your agreement.

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi. I work 16 hours a week and have done so for the past year and a half. Recently my employer tells me I have to start doing overtime which they know I cant so due to childcare issues. If I refuse they say I have to move to an 8 hour contract which is pointless. Can they do this?. Because of this I have decided to apply for flexible working, all I want is to stay at my 16hours instead of 16 hours plus overtime. Am I doing the right thing by applying for flexible working?
    Thanks

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi. I work 16 hours a week and have done so for the past year and a half. Recently my employer tells me I have to start doing overtime which they know I cant so due to childcare issues. If I refuse they say I have to move to an 8 hour contract which is pointless. Can they do this?. Because of this I have decided to apply for flexible working, all I want is to stay at my 16hours instead of 16 hours plus overtime. Am I doing the right thing by applying for flexible working?
    Thanks

    Editor: Does it state in your contract that you can be required to do regular overtime? If not, adding more hours to your work is a change to your terms and conditions and can only be done in consultation with you and with your agreement – see https://www.gov.uk/your-employment-contract-how-it-can-be-changed

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi, I have submitted a flexible working request to condense my 35 hours over 4 days (no weekends). I am due to return to work after 3 years – 1 year mat leave, 1 year career break and then another yea mat leave. Before left, I was already on a flexible working agreement, so I have just requested to start 1 hour later and my rest day to change. However, I had an informal meeting today and the business have asked me to work a week of lates and 2 weekends out of 6 and stated no agreement has been made for anyone to work mon-friday only, however I am aware colleagues have a flexible working agreement working 35 hours over 4 days and no weekends. I am unable to arrange childcare at weekends and when the team work until 4pm and 8pm, I have said I will work until 6pm – the latest as I need to pick up my children. I feel they are backing me into a corner so I resign as I am unable to work till 8pm. What happenes if we do not come to a compromise? Thank you.

    Editor: Our HR expert Sandra Beale says: She would have to agree the new working hours with the employer otherwise she would have to resign.  This is a new working arrangement and obviously a lot has changed in the three years she has been away.  If any of her colleagues with the requested working hours are men she might have a discrimination claim.

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi, I have submitted a flexible working request to condense my 35 hours over 4 days (no weekends). I am due to return to work after 3 years – 1 year mat leave, 1 year career break and then another yea mat leave. Before left, I was already on a flexible working agreement, so I have just requested to start 1 hour later and my rest day to change. However, I had an informal meeting today and the business have asked me to work a week of lates and 2 weekends out of 6 and stated no agreement has been made for anyone to work mon-friday only, however I am aware colleagues have a flexible working agreement working 35 hours over 4 days and no weekends. I am unable to arrange childcare at weekends and when the team work until 4pm and 8pm, I have said I will work until 6pm – the latest as I need to pick up my children. I feel they are backing me into a corner so I resign as I am unable to work till 8pm. What happenes if we do not come to a compromise? Thank you.

    Editor: Our HR expert Sandra Beale says: She would have to agree the new working hours with the employer otherwise she would have to resign.  This is a new working arrangement and obviously a lot has changed in the three years she has been away.  If any of her colleagues with the requested working hours are men she might have a discrimination claim.

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi, I have submitted a flexible working request to condense my 35 hours over 4 days (no weekends). I am due to return to work after 3 years – 1 year mat leave, 1 year career break and then another yea mat leave. Before left, I was already on a flexible working agreement, so I have just requested to start 1 hour later and my rest day to change. However, I had an informal meeting today and the business have asked me to work a week of lates and 2 weekends out of 6 and stated no agreement has been made for anyone to work mon-friday only, however I am aware colleagues have a flexible working agreement working 35 hours over 4 days and no weekends. I am unable to arrange childcare at weekends and when the team work until 4pm and 8pm, I have said I will work until 6pm – the latest as I need to pick up my children. I feel they are backing me into a corner so I resign as I am unable to work till 8pm. What happenes if we do not come to a compromise? Thank you.

    Editor: Our HR expert Sandra Beale says: She would have to agree the new working hours with the employer otherwise she would have to resign.  This is a new working arrangement and obviously a lot has changed in the three years she has been away.  If any of her colleagues with the requested working hours are men she might have a discrimination claim.

  • Anonymous says:

    I would welcome some advice please. I work weekends only. My husband is on a rolling rota of 3 on 3 off nigh-day shifts 12 hours. Now if he is on a night shift on a Friday night this leave us with childcare issues on the Saturday when Im at work. The same if he works a Saturday Day shift. Sundays aren't an issue as we have alternative arrangements with family. For months now he has been telling them of this child care issue and they DO NOTHING. It is causing huge strain on us both. At one point they told him to hire a babysitter! They keep saying he signed a contract to work weekends (hours never specified as shift patterns often change, but the contract never does), which is true but he is not refusing to work weekends just change the shift round slightly. (Friday day shift only and Saturday night shift only) They have been totally unsupportive and we really do not know what to do. Do we raise a grievance or go for Flexi hours? We have never been in the predicament before. He has been there a little over two years now. Any advice welcome please.

    Editor: The best thing is to try to solve the issue amicably so it is a good idea to put in a flexible working request. The employer will then be duty bound to consider the request seriously and give good reason for turning it down.

     

  • Anonymous says:

    I would welcome some advice please. I work weekends only. My husband is on a rolling rota of 3 on 3 off nigh-day shifts 12 hours. Now if he is on a night shift on a Friday night this leave us with childcare issues on the Saturday when Im at work. The same if he works a Saturday Day shift. Sundays aren't an issue as we have alternative arrangements with family. For months now he has been telling them of this child care issue and they DO NOTHING. It is causing huge strain on us both. At one point they told him to hire a babysitter! They keep saying he signed a contract to work weekends (hours never specified as shift patterns often change, but the contract never does), which is true but he is not refusing to work weekends just change the shift round slightly. (Friday day shift only and Saturday night shift only) They have been totally unsupportive and we really do not know what to do. Do we raise a grievance or go for Flexi hours? We have never been in the predicament before. He has been there a little over two years now. Any advice welcome please.

    Editor: The best thing is to try to solve the issue amicably so it is a good idea to put in a flexible working request. The employer will then be duty bound to consider the request seriously and give good reason for turning it down.

     

  • Anonymous says:

    I would welcome some advice please. I work weekends only. My husband is on a rolling rota of 3 on 3 off nigh-day shifts 12 hours. Now if he is on a night shift on a Friday night this leave us with childcare issues on the Saturday when Im at work. The same if he works a Saturday Day shift. Sundays aren't an issue as we have alternative arrangements with family. For months now he has been telling them of this child care issue and they DO NOTHING. It is causing huge strain on us both. At one point they told him to hire a babysitter! They keep saying he signed a contract to work weekends (hours never specified as shift patterns often change, but the contract never does), which is true but he is not refusing to work weekends just change the shift round slightly. (Friday day shift only and Saturday night shift only) They have been totally unsupportive and we really do not know what to do. Do we raise a grievance or go for Flexi hours? We have never been in the predicament before. He has been there a little over two years now. Any advice welcome please.

    Editor: The best thing is to try to solve the issue amicably so it is a good idea to put in a flexible working request. The employer will then be duty bound to consider the request seriously and give good reason for turning it down.

     

  • Anonymous says:

    Hiya – I work 4 days a week as a nursing assistant, I only work early shifts but I am not allowed a set day off.
    I have two children one of which is extremely disabled I have been working for this employer for 7 years (both maternity leave was taken here).
    It is costing me a fortune in childcare trying to juggle my days and is a huge stress for me however my new inpost manager tells me I cannot request a set day off "The days where people pick and choose what they want to work are over now I'm here" and also tells me that the service would not allow it, however the day I would like off has 1/2 the number of clinics – when I pointed this out I was simply told that she can't just do it for one person despite the fact that I have young children and am a carer.
    Help?

    Editor: Our HR expert Sandra Beale says: She should put in a flexible working request and prepare her argument with regards to less shifts on her set day off.  Potentially if the request is refused she may have a claim of associative discrimination in accordance with the Equality Act.   She could also possibly resign and claim constructive dismissal.

  • Anonymous says:

    Hiya – I work 4 days a week as a nursing assistant, I only work early shifts but I am not allowed a set day off.
    I have two children one of which is extremely disabled I have been working for this employer for 7 years (both maternity leave was taken here).
    It is costing me a fortune in childcare trying to juggle my days and is a huge stress for me however my new inpost manager tells me I cannot request a set day off "The days where people pick and choose what they want to work are over now I'm here" and also tells me that the service would not allow it, however the day I would like off has 1/2 the number of clinics – when I pointed this out I was simply told that she can't just do it for one person despite the fact that I have young children and am a carer.
    Help?

    Editor: Our HR expert Sandra Beale says: She should put in a flexible working request and prepare her argument with regards to less shifts on her set day off.  Potentially if the request is refused she may have a claim of associative discrimination in accordance with the Equality Act.   She could also possibly resign and claim constructive dismissal.

  • Anonymous says:

    Hiya – I work 4 days a week as a nursing assistant, I only work early shifts but I am not allowed a set day off.
    I have two children one of which is extremely disabled I have been working for this employer for 7 years (both maternity leave was taken here).
    It is costing me a fortune in childcare trying to juggle my days and is a huge stress for me however my new inpost manager tells me I cannot request a set day off "The days where people pick and choose what they want to work are over now I'm here" and also tells me that the service would not allow it, however the day I would like off has 1/2 the number of clinics – when I pointed this out I was simply told that she can't just do it for one person despite the fact that I have young children and am a carer.
    Help?

    Editor: Our HR expert Sandra Beale says: She should put in a flexible working request and prepare her argument with regards to less shifts on her set day off.  Potentially if the request is refused she may have a claim of associative discrimination in accordance with the Equality Act.   She could also possibly resign and claim constructive dismissal.

  • Anonymous says:

    Hello, I am about to write my letter for flexible working conditions. I am reading as much as I find on the internet. I just feel alone in the process. Who can I turn too, when I write the letter, for editing or advice? Thanks.

    Editor: Do you know anyone else among your friends or colleagues who has negotiated flexible working successfully? They would be a good source of advice. You could send in more information via our Advice & Support/Q & A page box for our career coaches, giving details of the kind of flexibility you want and why you want it, the type of job you do and any objections you think your work might put forward to your request. It is a good idea to try to put yourself in their shoes and anticipate their concerns in advance so you have an answer to them and can present your case as a positive for them and you. 

  • Anonymous says:

    Hello, I am about to write my letter for flexible working conditions. I am reading as much as I find on the internet. I just feel alone in the process. Who can I turn too, when I write the letter, for editing or advice? Thanks.

    Editor: Do you know anyone else among your friends or colleagues who has negotiated flexible working successfully? They would be a good source of advice. You could send in more information via our Advice & Support/Q & A page box for our career coaches, giving details of the kind of flexibility you want and why you want it, the type of job you do and any objections you think your work might put forward to your request. It is a good idea to try to put yourself in their shoes and anticipate their concerns in advance so you have an answer to them and can present your case as a positive for them and you. 

  • Anonymous says:

    Hello, I am about to write my letter for flexible working conditions. I am reading as much as I find on the internet. I just feel alone in the process. Who can I turn too, when I write the letter, for editing or advice? Thanks.

    Editor: Do you know anyone else among your friends or colleagues who has negotiated flexible working successfully? They would be a good source of advice. You could send in more information via our Advice & Support/Q & A page box for our career coaches, giving details of the kind of flexibility you want and why you want it, the type of job you do and any objections you think your work might put forward to your request. It is a good idea to try to put yourself in their shoes and anticipate their concerns in advance so you have an answer to them and can present your case as a positive for them and you. 

  • Anonymous says:

    I am a mum working full time, my hours have been set for the last 5 years 6.30am -14.30pm which allows me to pick my child up from school. I have been told by a new manager that I am no longer allowed to work these hours and being forced to work 9-5 , what are my rights to this?

    Editor: Changing your hours is a change to your terms and conditions and as such you have a right to be consulted on this – see https://www.gov.uk/your-employment-contract-how-it-can-be-changed

  • Anonymous says:

    I am a mum working full time, my hours have been set for the last 5 years 6.30am -14.30pm which allows me to pick my child up from school. I have been told by a new manager that I am no longer allowed to work these hours and being forced to work 9-5 , what are my rights to this?

    Editor: Changing your hours is a change to your terms and conditions and as such you have a right to be consulted on this.

  • Anonymous says:

    I am a mum working full time, my hours have been set for the last 5 years 6.30am -14.30pm which allows me to pick my child up from school. I have been told by a new manager that I am no longer allowed to work these hours and being forced to work 9-5 , what are my rights to this?

  • Anonymous says:

    All they said that they can't accommodate my hours; the way it works my request goes to a panel who just look and make a decision. Yes, I made it very clear about my childcare issues – in fact that was the only reason I want to change, I offered to work weekends, all I wanted was to do set hours rather then doing different shifts, but they said no. I need to find someone who will pick my kids up from school and keep then until I finish work. I'm just very confused – I've never heard anything like this. I'm just thinking of leaving them.

    Editor: Did they put in writing why they refused your request and does it fit with the eight grounds above on which a request can be turned down? Did they show that they had given your request due consideration? Are you still within the 14-day period so you can appeal if the legislation was not followed properly?

     

  • Anonymous says:

    All they said that they can't accommodate my hours; the way it works my request goes to a panel who just look and make a decision. Yes, I made it very clear about my childcare issues – in fact that was the only reason I want to change, I offered to work weekends, all I wanted was to do set hours rather then doing different shifts, but they said no. I need to find someone who will pick my kids up from school and keep then until I finish work. I'm just very confused – I've never heard anything like this. I'm just thinking of leaving them.

    Editor: Did they put in writing why they refused your request and does it fit with the eight grounds above on which a request can be turned down? Did they show that they had given your request due consideration? Are you still within the 14-day period so you can appeal if the legislation was not followed properly?

     

  • Anonymous says:

    All they said that they can't accommodate my hours; the way it works my request goes to a panel who just look and make a decision. Yes, I made it very clear about my childcare issues – in fact that was the only reason I want to change, I offered to work weekends, all I wanted was to do set hours rather then doing different shifts, but they said no. I need to find someone who will pick my kids up from school and keep then until I finish work. I'm just very confused – I've never heard anything like this. I'm just thinking of leaving them.

    Editor: Did they put in writing why they refused your request and does it fit with the eight grounds above on which a request can be turned down? Did they show that they had given your request due consideration? Are you still within the 14-day period so you can appeal if the legislation was not followed properly?

     

  • Anonymous says:

    I work full time for a very well known insurance company on shift. Each week is different, due to my husband leaving me I am finding it very hard with picking my kids up from school and being with them. I requested flexible working. I said I could still do my full hours. I just need to have a set time 9-3 or even 8-3 so that I pick my kids up. They refused my application saying the panel has declined it, that we don't have a way of having you on fixed hours, but they have other people who work part time. I was willing to do full hours. Now I am very upset and getting very worried. I do not know what to do. If I leave how will I meet my financial needs? I have to do all myself. Can anyone help me and advise me what to do.

    Editor: On what grounds did they refuse your application? According to the flexible working legislation they can only refuse the application on one of eight grounds -Did they refuse on these grounds and did they show they had given due consideration to your request and not simply dismissed it out of hand? Did you tell them about the childcare issues you have? Is there any room for negotiation with them? They need to explain fully why they cannot accommodate your request and then you can try to find a middle way which addresses their concerns and helps meet your needs.

  • Anonymous says:

    I work full time for a very well known insurance company on shift. Each week is different, due to my husband leaving me I am finding it very hard with picking my kids up from school and being with them. I requested flexible working. I said I could still do my full hours. I just need to have a set time 9-3 or even 8-3 so that I pick my kids up. They refused my application saying the panel has declined it, that we don't have a way of having you on fixed hours, but they have other people who work part time. I was willing to do full hours. Now I am very upset and getting very worried. I do not know what to do. If I leave how will I meet my financial needs? I have to do all myself. Can anyone help me and advise me what to do.

    Editor: On what grounds did they refuse your application? According to the flexible working legislation they can only refuse the application on one of eight grounds.

  • Anonymous says:

    I work full time for a very well known insurance company on shift. Each week is different, due to my husband leaving me I am finding it very hard with picking my kids up from school and being with them. I requested flexible working. I said I could still do my full hours. I just need to have a set time 9-3 or even 8-3 so that I pick my kids up. They refused my application saying the panel has declined it, that we don't have a way of having you on fixed hours, but they have other people who work part time. I was willing to do full hours. Now I am very upset and getting very worried. I do not know what to do. If I leave how will I meet my financial needs? I have to do all myself. Can anyone help me and advise me what to do.

  • Anonymous says:

    I have been working weekends for the last two yrs now that I have a new born baby and my miss also went back to work she now works weekends do I stand a chance of my employer agreeing to change my days.

    Editor: You have the right as a parent to apply for flexible working and your employer must follow this procedure which means they can only turn your request down on one of eight grounds and must have shown that they have given it reasonable consideration. Otherwise you can appeal.

  • Anonymous says:

    I have been working weekends for the last two yrs now that I have a new born baby and my miss also went back to work she now works weekends do I stand a chance of my employer agreeing to change my days.

  • Anonymous says:

    I have been working weekends for the last two yrs now that I have a new born baby and my miss also went back to work she now works weekends do I stand a chance of my employer agreeing to change my days.

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi, reguarding the above – the letter I received wasn't written as a refusal, just didn't mention the original hours i had asked for at all. All it said was i would be missing peak days and that was against "policy" (there isn't such a policy for the company, as each store is different), but nothing under the 8 guidelines. I was working full-time and going back to this minus 3 hours, but the hours i've been given take away 3 hours more. My line manager hasn't spoken to me either since I put in the appeal, but has been overheard discussing it with other staff. Apart from the grievance, do I have the grounds to take it to a tribunal?

    Editor: You need to exhaust all other remedies first and then seek full legal advice based on a much more detailed assessment of your case. eg through your local Citizens Advice Bureau. 

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi, reguarding the above – the letter I received wasn't written as a refusal, just didn't mention the original hours i had asked for at all. All it said was i would be missing peak days and that was against "policy" (there isn't such a policy for the company, as each store is different), but nothing under the 8 guidelines. I was working full-time and going back to this minus 3 hours, but the hours i've been given take away 3 hours more. My line manager hasn't spoken to me either since I put in the appeal, but has been overheard discussing it with other staff. Apart from the grievance, do I have the grounds to take it to a tribunal?

    Editor: You need to exhaust all other remedies first and then seek full legal advice based on a much more detailed assessment of your case. eg through your local Citizens Advice Bureau. 

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi, reguarding the above – the letter I received wasn't written as a refusal, just didn't mention the original hours i had asked for at all. All it said was i would be missing peak days and that was against "policy" (there isn't such a policy for the company, as each store is different), but nothing under the 8 guidelines. I was working full-time and going back to this minus 3 hours, but the hours i've been given take away 3 hours more. My line manager hasn't spoken to me either since I put in the appeal, but has been overheard discussing it with other staff. Apart from the grievance, do I have the grounds to take it to a tribunal?

    Editor: You need to exhaust all other remedies first and then seek full legal advice based on a much more detailed assessment of your case. eg through your local Citizens Advice Bureau. 

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi, I work for a well-known high street store, apparently it was the first to allow flexible working. I am currently on maternity leave which ends next month and put in a flexible hours request at the end of june. Once the 28 days were up, i went to see my manager and was toldthey hadn't even looked at it. It took 83 days for me to get a meeting with my manager after going in every month. I've talked to my store manager and hr representative as well about it. I've asked to compress my hours from 5 days into 3 days and this was rejected even after being verbally told it was ok. I've been offered 4 days including every other weekend. I was given no reasoning behind the decision. I have since appealed and was first given a manager who wasn't impartial to the situation and who didn't follow company policy, so i rejected the meeting and asked for another one with someone impartial. (I took a union representative into the meeting with me) and am currently waiting for the next meeting to be arranged. I've sent an email outlining the problems to my store manager and hr representative, but haven't had an answer except that it would be dealt with in the meeting. I don't know where to go from here? I'm planning on putting in a grievance, but not until after a result.it feels like i'm being fobbed off by my employer.

    Editor: You are right to wait for the outcome of the appeal hearing and then file a grievance about failure to meet the stipulations of the legislation. Has your employer given you the reasons for rejecting your request? Do they fit with the eight grounds allowed under the legislation?

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi, I work for a well-known high street store, apparently it was the first to allow flexible working. I am currently on maternity leave which ends next month and put in a flexible hours request at the end of june. Once the 28 days were up, i went to see my manager and was toldthey hadn't even looked at it. It took 83 days for me to get a meeting with my manager after going in every month. I've talked to my store manager and hr representative as well about it. I've asked to compress my hours from 5 days into 3 days and this was rejected even after being verbally told it was ok. I've been offered 4 days including every other weekend. I was given no reasoning behind the decision. I have since appealed and was first given a manager who wasn't impartial to the situation and who didn't follow company policy, so i rejected the meeting and asked for another one with someone impartial. (I took a union representative into the meeting with me) and am currently waiting for the next meeting to be arranged. I've sent an email outlining the problems to my store manager and hr representative, but haven't had an answer except that it would be dealt with in the meeting. I don't know where to go from here? I'm planning on putting in a grievance, but not until after a result.it feels like i'm being fobbed off by my employer.

    Editor: You are right to wait for the outcome of the appeal hearing and then file a grievance about failure to meet the stipulations of the legislation. Has your employer given you the reasons for rejecting your request? Do they fit with the eight grounds allowed under the legislation?

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi, I work for a well-known high street store, apparently it was the first to allow flexible working. I am currently on maternity leave which ends next month and put in a flexible hours request at the end of june. Once the 28 days were up, i went to see my manager and was toldthey hadn't even looked at it. It took 83 days for me to get a meeting with my manager after going in every month. I've talked to my store manager and hr representative as well about it. I've asked to compress my hours from 5 days into 3 days and this was rejected even after being verbally told it was ok. I've been offered 4 days including every other weekend. I was given no reasoning behind the decision. I have since appealed and was first given a manager who wasn't impartial to the situation and who didn't follow company policy, so i rejected the meeting and asked for another one with someone impartial. (I took a union representative into the meeting with me) and am currently waiting for the next meeting to be arranged. I've sent an email outlining the problems to my store manager and hr representative, but haven't had an answer except that it would be dealt with in the meeting. I don't know where to go from here? I'm planning on putting in a grievance, but not until after a result.it feels like i'm being fobbed off by my employer.

    Editor: You are right to wait for the outcome of the appeal hearing and then file a grievance about failure to meet the stipulations of the legislation. Has your employer given you the reasons for rejecting your request? Do they fit with the eight grounds allowed under the legislation?

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi there. I have had my flexible working declined I work for a large well known store and they have refused on grounds that it would impose an unreasonable burden of costs on the company and they cannot recruit additional staff. I work 16 hours and I'm wanting to work over 2 full days my reason is I have now got 2 children under the age of 2 and to work over more than 2 days makes my childcare bill bigger than my wages. Have I got any grounds to appeal?

    Editor: The grounds cited are within flexible working legislation and you could only appeal if you think your employer has not given your request due consideration, for instance, looking at ways around the issue. You do not say how many hours you worked before and how your employer is looking to spread your 16 hours. Perhaps there is a compromise you can come to which would address their business issues?

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi there. I have had my flexible working declined I work for a large well known store and they have refused on grounds that it would impose an unreasonable burden of costs on the company and they cannot recruit additional staff. I work 16 hours and I'm wanting to work over 2 full days my reason is I have now got 2 children under the age of 2 and to work over more than 2 days makes my childcare bill bigger than my wages. Have I got any grounds to appeal?

    Editor: The grounds cited are within flexible working legislation and you could only appeal if you think your employer has not given your request due consideration, for instance, looking at ways around the issue.

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi there. I have had my flexible working declined I work for a large well known store and they have refused on grounds that it would impose an unreasonable burden of costs on the company and they cannot recruit additional staff. I work 16 hours and I'm wanting to work over 2 full days my reason is I have now got 2 children under the age of 2 and to work over more than 2 days makes my childcare bill bigger than my wages. Have I got any grounds to appeal?

  • Anonymous says:

    I am a single mum of 2 and I am looking on the internet for mum jobs, at present I am not finding anything. It is very frustrating. What can I do?

    Editor: You do not state what areas you are looking and what your experience in terms of work is. The best thing is to hone down what skills you have and then look for a job that might apply. Do you need homeworking or flexible hours? If you can write into our experts via the Advice & Support/Q & A page box with more information about how you want to work and what your skills are then our careers expert can help.

  • Anonymous says:

    I am a single mum of 2 and I am looking on the internet for mum jobs, at present I am not finding anything. It is very frustrating. What can I do?
    Editor: You do not state what areas you are looking and what your experience in terms of work is. The best thing is to hone down what skills you have and then look for a job that might apply. Do you need homeworking or flexible hours? If you can write into our experts via the Advice & Support/Q & A page box with more information about how you want to work and what your skills are then our careers expert can help.

  • Anonymous says:

    I submitted a request in Jan that would allow me to work a 4 day week until September and be reviewed then. It was accepted and things have been great. I wish to extend it past September – will this count as a 2nd request or a moderation of the original?

    Editor: If it was agreed it would be reviewed at the previous meeting then it should not be viewed as a new request.

  • Anonymous says:

    I submitted a request in Jan that would allow me to work a 4 day week until September and be reviewed then. It was accepted and things have been great. I wish to extend it past September – will this count as a 2nd request or a moderation of the original?

    Editor: If it was agreed it would be reviewed at the previous meeting then it should not be viewed as a new request.

  • Anonymous says:

    I submitted a request in Jan that would allow me to work a 4 day week until September and be reviewed then. It was accepted and things have been great. I wish to extend it past September – will this count as a 2nd request or a moderation of the original?

    Editor: If it was agreed it would be reviewed at the previous meeting then it should not be viewed as a new request.

  • Anonymous says:

    I submitted a flexible working request which condensed my working hours from 4 days into 3. My employer rejected this and offered me an alternative of 5 days and a reduction in hours. Is my employer legally allowed to only offer me flexible working with a reduction or do they have to keep to my contracted hours? Also am I able to appeal on the grounds they are asking me to reduce my hours?

    Editor: The flexible working process is a negotiation. Your employer can offer you an alternative to what you have put forward, but you do not have to agree to it. You can appeal if you think the reason they have rejected your original request [they should have put this to you in writing] shows that they have not given it due consideration. It would be good to have some form of back-up proposal which you think your employer may agree to based on their original reasons for rejection.

  • Anonymous says:

    I submitted a flexible working request which condensed my working hours from 4 days into 3. My employer rejected this and offered me an alternative of 5 days and a reduction in hours. Is my employer legally allowed to only offer me flexible working with a reduction or do they have to keep to my contracted hours? Also am I able to appeal on the grounds they are asking me to reduce my hours?

    Editor: The flexible working process is a negotiation. Your employer can offer you an alternative to what you have put forward, but you do not have to agree to it. You can appeal if you think the reason they have rejected your original request [they should have put this to you in writing] shows that they have not given it due consideration. It would be good to have some form of back-up proposal which you think your employer may agree to based on their original reasons for rejection.

  • Anonymous says:

    I submitted a flexible working request which condensed my working hours from 4 days into 3. My employer rejected this and offered me an alternative of 5 days and a reduction in hours. Is my employer legally allowed to only offer me flexible working with a reduction or do they have to keep to my contracted hours? Also am I able to appeal on the grounds they are asking me to reduce my hours?

    Editor: The flexible working process is a negotiation. Your employer can offer you an alternative to what you have put forward, but you do not have to agree to it. You can appeal if you think the reason they have rejected your original request [they should have put this to you in writing] shows that they have not given it due consideration. It would be good to have some form of back-up proposal which you think your employer may agree to based on their original reasons for rejection.

  • Anonymous says:

    Thank you for the above answer. How much contact is one supposed to have while on maternity leave? I was never contacted, unless I made the contact. Even when my pay stopped there was no letter to let me know that was my last pay. I feel like I didn't get enough support, hence the subject of annual leave passed by.

    Editor: Your employer is entitled to make reasonable contact with you on maternity leave. You can have up to 10 keeping in touch days when you can go into the office and not lose maternity pay. They should also inform you about any changes to your terms and conditions. A good employer would definitely inform you of your rights to annual leave.

  • Anonymous says:

    Thank you for the above answer. How much contact is one supposed to have while on maternity leave? I was never contacted, unless I made the contact. Even when my pay stopped there was no letter to let me know that was my last pay. I feel like I didn't get enough support, hence the subject of annual leave passed by.

    Editor: Your employer is entitled to make reasonable contact with you on maternity leave. You can have up to 10 keeping in touch days when you can go into the office and not lose maternity pay. They should also inform you about any changes to your terms and conditions. A good employer would definitely inform you of your rights to annual leave.

  • Anonymous says:

    Thank you for the above answer. How much contact is one supposed to have while on maternity leave? I was never contacted, unless I made the contact. Even when my pay stopped there was no letter to let me know that was my last pay. I feel like I didn't get enough support, hence the subject of annual leave passed by.

    Editor: Your employer is entitled to make reasonable contact with you on maternity leave. You can have up to 10 keeping in touch days when you can go into the office and not lose maternity pay. They should also inform you about any changes to your terms and conditions. A good employer would definitely inform you of your rights to annual leave.

  • Anonymous says:

    I was on sick leave then maternity leave. As I had not used my a/l for the year, I had to use it while on sick leave. I had a meeting with my manager to discuss my plan to return to work and requested my leave as my maternity leave is finishing at the end of April. She told me I can't take it as it's too late so I have lost 25 days. How does that work? What was I supposed to do? How long is maternity leave and where does A/L come in while you are on maternity leave??

    Editor: You are entitled to annual leave while you are on maternity leave in the same way as you receive it when you are in work. However, some organisations do not allow you to carry annual leave over from one financial year to another. This may be what your manager is referring to. Maternity leave can be anything from two weeks up to 52 weeks. It is up to you to decide how long you want to take.

  • Anonymous says:

    Ok after several emails chasing up my flexible working application meeting, I was given a meeting 31 days after my application. The HR dept couldn't find my application form and asked if I could re-do it during the meeting! And then spent half an hour telling me all the problems it would cause! They didn't ask me about my situation. I felt I had solutions to all their concerns, but felt they were just going through the motions. They kept saying how term time working was not something they do. Anyway 14 days after meeting and still no letter, phone call, email or anything with a decision. Very annoyed with company that they seem to do whatever they want and have no respect for procedure. What can I do next?

    Editor: You could send a reminder reminding them of the procedure and timetable for considering a flexible work request. It is probably best to do this first before resorting to lodging a grievance, but this would be your next option if you hear nothing. Also, if they do turn down your request, you can certainly appeal on the grounds that they have not followed the timetable and also if you doubt they have given your request due consideration.

  • Anonymous says:

    I was on sick leave then maternity leave. As I had not used my a/l for the year, I had to use it while on sick leave. I had a meeting with my manager to discuss my plan to return to work and requested my leave as my maternity leave is finishing at the end of April. She told me I can't take it as it's too late so I have lost 25 days. How does that work? What was I supposed to do? How long is maternity leave and where does A/L come in while you are on maternity leave??

    Editor: You are entitled to annual leave while you are on maternity leave in the same way as you receive it when you are in work. However, some organisations do not allow you to carry annual leave over from one financial year to another. This may be what your manager is referring to. Maternity leave can be anything from two weeks up to 52 weeks. It is up to you to decide how long you want to take.

  • Anonymous says:

    Ok after several emails chasing up my flexible working application meeting, I was given a meeting 31 days after my application. The HR dept couldn't find my application form and asked if I could re-do it during the meeting! And then spent half an hour telling me all the problems it would cause! They didn't ask me about my situation. I felt I had solutions to all their concerns, but felt they were just going through the motions. They kept saying how term time working was not something they do. Anyway 14 days after meeting and still no letter, phone call, email or anything with a decision. Very annoyed with company that they seem to do whatever they want and have no respect for procedure. What can I do next?

    Editor: You could send a reminder reminding them of the procedure and timetable for considering a flexible work request. It is probably best to do this first before resorting to lodging a grievance, but this would be your next option if you hear nothing. Also, if they do turn down your request, you can certainly appeal on the grounds that they have not followed the timetable and also if you doubt they have given your request due consideration.

  • Anonymous says:

    I was on sick leave then maternity leave. As I had not used my a/l for the year, I had to use it while on sick leave. I had a meeting with my manager to discuss my plan to return to work and requested my leave as my maternity leave is finishing at the end of April. She told me I can't take it as it's too late so I have lost 25 days. How does that work? What was I supposed to do? How long is maternity leave and where does A/L come in while you are on maternity leave??

    Editor: You are entitled to annual leave while you are on maternity leave in the same way as you receive it when you are in work. However, some organisations do not allow you to carry annual leave over from one financial year to another. This may be what your manager is referring to. Maternity leave can be anything from two weeks up to 52 weeks. It is up to you to decide how long you want to take.

  • Anonymous says:

    Ok after several emails chasing up my flexible working application meeting, I was given a meeting 31 days after my application. The HR dept couldn't find my application form and asked if I could re-do it during the meeting! And then spent half an hour telling me all the problems it would cause! They didn't ask me about my situation. I felt I had solutions to all their concerns, but felt they were just going through the motions. They kept saying how term time working was not something they do. Anyway 14 days after meeting and still no letter, phone call, email or anything with a decision. Very annoyed with company that they seem to do whatever they want and have no respect for procedure. What can I do next?

  • Anonymous says:

    I have been on maternity leave and was due to return to work 2 weeks ago. However only 5 weeks before this, I had a meeting with my employer to discuss flexible working to be later told that there had been a 'freeze' on all part time and flexible hours and I was notified by letter that it will take up to 14 weeks, possibly longer for any updates. Myself and another colleague (in the very same position) have said we are willing to do a job share and this again is not being considered. I have had to take all my accrued holidays as I cannot afford to have unpaid maternity and my holidays will end in 10 days and after several attempts at contacting them, I'm still no closer to knowing anything. Are we being treated unfairly?

    Editor: Has your employer given any reason for this freeze? Legally, employers have to follow a set timetable once a flexible work application has been submitted and they can only turn down requests on specific grounds.

  • Anonymous says:

    I have been on maternity leave and was due to return to work 2 weeks ago. However only 5 weeks before this, I had a meeting with my employer to discuss flexible working to be later told that there had been a 'freeze' on all part time and flexible hours and I was notified by letter that it will take up to 14 weeks, possibly longer for any updates. Myself and another colleague (in the very same position) have said we are willing to do a job share and this again is not being considered. I have had to take all my accrued holidays as I cannot afford to have unpaid maternity and my holidays will end in 10 days and after several attempts at contacting them, I'm still no closer to knowing anything. Are we being treated unfairly?

  • Anonymous says:

    I have been on maternity leave and was due to return to work 2 weeks ago. However only 5 weeks before this, I had a meeting with my employer to discuss flexible working to be later told that there had been a 'freeze' on all part time and flexible hours and I was notified by letter that it will take up to 14 weeks, possibly longer for any updates. Myself and another colleague (in the very same position) have said we are willing to do a job share and this again is not being considered. I have had to take all my accrued holidays as I cannot afford to have unpaid maternity and my holidays will end in 10 days and after several attempts at contacting them, I'm still no closer to knowing anything. Are we being treated unfairly?

  • Anonymous says:

    What happens if a meeting has not been organised within 28 days.  I have sent a reminder today, but the 28 days expires next week? What do I do next?

    Editor: You could send another reminder, pointing out the legislation requirements and then consider filing a grievance. Employers who do not follow the set procedures risk being taken to an Employment Tribunal and possibly having to pay compensation to the employee. However, it is in your interests to try and settle this amicably and ensure that they look on your request in a favourable light before resorting to the law.

  • Anonymous says:

    What happens if a meeting has not been organised within 28 days.  I have sent a reminder today, but the 28 days expires next week? What do I do next?

    Editor: You could send another reminder, pointing out the legislation requirements and then consider filing a grievance. Employers who do not follow the set procedures risk being taken to an Employment Tribunal and possibly having to pay compensation to the employee. However, it is in your interests to try and settle this amicably and ensure that they look on your request in a favourable light before resorting to the law.

  • Anonymous says:

    What happens if a meeting has not been organised within 28 days.  I have sent a reminder today, but the 28 days expires next week? What do I do next?

    Editor: You could send another reminder, pointing out the legislation requirements and then consider filing a grievance. Employers who do not follow the set procedures risk being taken to an Employment Tribunal and possibly having to pay compensation to the employee. However, it is in your interests to try and settle this amicably and ensure that they look on your request in a favourable light before resorting to the law.

  • Anonymous says:

    I am trying to get back into the workplace as a part time employee. This process is proving to be incredibly difficult.
    My employer advises me there are no positions for part time workers. It’s full time or nothing. I enquired about job share and have found another colleague who is willing to job share. Now we have to find a suitable job. We believe we have found one, but have been advised that it’s for full time, but the hours suit us. However, as one other full-time colleague has applied for the job we have to be interviewed. How does this work? What if I pass the interview and the colleague I wish to job share with fails or vice versa? If only one of us passes we can’t take the job as it’s a full time position! How should this process work?

    Editor: There is no set process for this and what you describe can happen. You would then have to find – or your employer could suggest – another potential job share candidate or convince your employer that the job could be done part time. As job shares are still relatively rare, particularly in certain fields, it is a good idea to use the interview to point out the advantages to the organisation of having a job share – two people’s experience, etc – and how you would make it work.

  • Anonymous says:

    I am trying to get back into the workplace as a part time employee. This process is proving to be incredibly difficult.
    My employer advises me there are no positions for part time workers. It’s full time or nothing. I enquired about job share and have found another colleague who is willing to job share. Now we have to find a suitable job. We believe we have found one, but have been advised that it’s for full time, but the hours suit us. However, as one other full-time colleague has applied for the job we have to be interviewed. How does this work? What if I pass the interview and the colleague I wish to job share with fails or vice versa? If only one of us passes we can’t take the job as it’s a full time position! How should this process work?

    Editor: There is no set process for this and what you describe can happen. You would then have to find – or your employer could suggest – another potential job share candidate or convince your employer that the job could be done part time. As job shares are still relatively rare, particularly in certain fields, it is a good idea to use the interview to point out the advantages to the organisation of having a job share – two people’s experience, etc – and how you would make it work.

  • Anonymous says:

    I am trying to get back into the workplace as a part time employee. This process is proving to be incredibly difficult.
    My employer advises me there are no positions for part time workers. It’s full time or nothing. I enquired about job share and have found another colleague who is willing to job share. Now we have to find a suitable job. We believe we have found one, but have been advised that it’s for full time, but the hours suit us. However, as one other full-time colleague has applied for the job we have to be interviewed. How does this work? What if I pass the interview and the colleague I wish to job share with fails or vice versa? If only one of us passes we can’t take the job as it’s a full time position! How should this process work?

    Editor: There is no set process for this and what you describe can happen. You would then have to find – or your employer could suggest – another potential job share candidate or convince your employer that the job could be done part time. As job shares are still relatively rare, particularly in certain fields, it is a good idea to use the interview to point out the advantages to the organisation of having a job share – two people’s experience, etc – and how you would make it work.

  • Anonymous says:

    I originally sent my request for flexible working on 5th December without any reply. Only after numerous emails and phone calls they old me that HR had moved and I sent it to wrong office. Why someone couldn’t have redirected it instead of ignoring it I don’t know, but anyway I resent my request on 11th January…my meeting was arranged 35 days after and it has been 19 days since my meeting and still no decision has been made. I have sent numerous emails reminding them of the legislation but no reply. What should I do?

    Editor: You could consider lodging a grievance, citing the legislation, but it might be better to remind them one more time and say you are considering taking further action if there is no decision soon.

  • Anonymous says:

    I originally sent my request for flexible working on 5th December without any reply. Only after numerous emails and phone calls they old me that HR had moved and I sent it to wrong office. Why someone couldn’t have redirected it instead of ignoring it I don’t know, but anyway I resent my request on 11th January…my meeting was arranged 35 days after and it has been 19 days since my meeting and still no decision has been made. I have sent numerous emails reminding them of the legislation but no reply. What should I do?

    Editor: You could consider lodging a grievance, citing the legislation, but it might be better to remind them one more time and say you are considering taking further action if there is no decision soon.

  • Anonymous says:

    I originally sent my request for flexible working on 5th December without any reply. Only after numerous emails and phone calls they old me that HR had moved and I sent it to wrong office. Why someone couldn’t have redirected it instead of ignoring it I don’t know, but anyway I resent my request on 11th January…my meeting was arranged 35 days after and it has been 19 days since my meeting and still no decision has been made. I have sent numerous emails reminding them of the legislation but no reply. What should I do?

    Editor: You could consider lodging a grievance, citing the legislation, but it might be better to remind them one more time and say you are considering taking further action if there is no decision soon.

  • Anonymous says:

    Hello, I work in the ambulance service and would like to go to university to study a 2-year degree course, but would like to reduce my working hours to 48 hours a month. How can I go about this without it being rejected? Many thanks.

    Editor: You will have to provide a bit more information for our careers expert. For instance, is the course related to your ambulance work and so would enhance your work? Does your organisation have a flexible working policy and do you know of or can you find out about any other colleagues who have a similar arrangement? Please reply via the Advice & Support/Q & A page box and then we can follow up via email.

  • Anonymous says:

    Hello, I work in the ambulance service and would like to go to university to study a 2-year degree course, but would like to reduce my working hours to 48 hours a month. How can I go about this without it being rejected? Many thanks.

    Editor: You will have to provide a bit more information for our careers expert. For instance, is the course related to your ambulance work and so would enhance your work? Does your organisation have a flexible working policy and do you know of or can you find out about any other colleagues who have a similar arrangement? Please reply via the Advice & Support/Q & A page box and then we can follow up via email.

  • Anonymous says:

    Hello, I work in the ambulance service and would like to go to university to study a 2-year degree course, but would like to reduce my working hours to 48 hours a month. How can I go about this without it being rejected? Many thanks.

    Editor: You will have to provide a bit more information for our careers expert. For instance, is the course related to your ambulance work and so would enhance your work? Does your organisation have a flexible working policy and do you know of or can you find out about any other colleagues who have a similar arrangement? Please reply via the Advice & Support/Q & A page box and then we can follow up via email.

  • Anonymous says:

    Thanks for responding. I work for the NHS as an allied health professional. So far reasons given are that my request would result in inefficient use of my clinic room – my response is that it would continue to be available for others to use for 2 days as at present as I propose to work the extra day every 4th week from schools/admin base (no one else uses my clinic room on a regular or even irregular basis). It was also suggested that all other part-time employees in my department work whole days or standard half days and they are already being flexible having agreed when I started working a year ago that I can finish at 2.45pm on 2 days, I’m only asking for this to be extended to my 3rd working day! I previously worked for a different health board and my manager (also a mother) fully embraced flexible working because she was aware of the benefit of having parents at work who are not stressed about who will be picking their children up that day. I have approached HR on this issue and was advised to speak to my union! It shouldn’t be this hard!


  • Anonymous says:

    Thanks for responding. I work for the NHS as an allied health professional. So far reasons given are that my request would result in inefficient use of my clinic room – my response is that it would continue to be available for others to use for 2 days as at present as I propose to work the extra day every 4th week from schools/admin base (no one else uses my clinic room on a regular or even irregular basis). It was also suggested that all other part-time employees in my department work whole days or standard half days and they are already being flexible having agreed when I started working a year ago that I can finish at 2.45pm on 2 days, I’m only asking for this to be extended to my 3rd working day! I previously worked for a different health board and my manager (also a mother) fully embraced flexible working because she was aware of the benefit of having parents at work who are not stressed about who will be picking their children up that day. I have approached HR on this issue and was advised to speak to my union! It shouldn’t be this hard!


  • Anonymous says:

    Thanks for responding. I work for the NHS as an allied health professional. So far reasons given are that my request would result in inefficient use of my clinic room – my response is that it would continue to be available for others to use for 2 days as at present as I propose to work the extra day every 4th week from schools/admin base (no one else uses my clinic room on a regular or even irregular basis). It was also suggested that all other part-time employees in my department work whole days or standard half days and they are already being flexible having agreed when I started working a year ago that I can finish at 2.45pm on 2 days, I’m only asking for this to be extended to my 3rd working day! I previously worked for a different health board and my manager (also a mother) fully embraced flexible working because she was aware of the benefit of having parents at work who are not stressed about who will be picking their children up that day. I have approached HR on this issue and was advised to speak to my union! It shouldn’t be this hard!


  • Anonymous says:

    I made a request for flexible working (averaging hours over 4 weeks so that I can fulfill contracted hours (18.75) within school hours 3 days per week working an extra day every 4th week). My employer has refused my request, but suggested an alternative (working 5 mornings per week). I refused on grounds of work/life balance. Will refusal of their alternative look bad on appeal? In addition to flexible working policy my employer has a carers leave policy that states the opportunity for a long-term reduction in hours. I have expressed that if my employer won’t sanction my proposed hours under flexible working my second preference would be reduction of hours. What are my options if they refuse? We’re still in talks to resolve informally.

    Editor: Flexible working is often a negotiation of what works best for you and for the business so it looks like you are engaged in this. I am not sure what job you do and what the grounds your employer has given for refusing your first suggestion. Are their objections justifiable within flexible working legislation?

    If you do refuse their alternative – is this because it is totally impossible for you to do it? – can you suggest another alternative that addresses their reasons for suggesting it and for refusing your first request, if those reasons are justifiable? With regard to the option of reducing your hours, you would have to wait and see on what grounds they might refuse this. Does the carers leave policy outline possible reasons for refusing a request and do you know other colleagues who have used this facility successfully? If you require legal advice, please contact us via our Advice & Support/Q& A page box.

  • Anonymous says:

    I made a request for flexible working (averaging hours over 4 weeks so that I can fulfill contracted hours (18.75) within school hours 3 days per week working an extra day every 4th week). My employer has refused my request, but suggested an alternative (working 5 mornings per week). I refused on grounds of work/life balance. Will refusal of their alternative look bad on appeal? In addition to flexible working policy my employer has a carers leave policy that states the opportunity for a long-term reduction in hours. I have expressed that if my employer won’t sanction my proposed hours under flexible working my second preference would be reduction of hours. What are my options if they refuse? We’re still in talks to resolve informally.

  • Anonymous says:

    I made a request for flexible working (averaging hours over 4 weeks so that I can fulfill contracted hours (18.75) within school hours 3 days per week working an extra day every 4th week). My employer has refused my request, but suggested an alternative (working 5 mornings per week). I refused on grounds of work/life balance. Will refusal of their alternative look bad on appeal? In addition to flexible working policy my employer has a carers leave policy that states the opportunity for a long-term reduction in hours. I have expressed that if my employer won’t sanction my proposed hours under flexible working my second preference would be reduction of hours. What are my options if they refuse? We’re still in talks to resolve informally.

    Editor: Flexible working is often a negotiation of what works best for you and for the business so it looks like you are engaged in this. I am not sure what job you do and what the grounds your employer has given for refusing your first suggestion. Are their objections justifiable within flexible working legislation?

  • Anonymous says:

    I sent my employer a request for flexible working on 5th December and still not heard anything back. Should I resend my email?

    Editor: According to the flexible working legislation, your employer has to arrange a meeting within 28 days of the request being filed/ It is worth sending a reminder and pointing out that according to the legislation they have to arrange a meeting within 28 days.

  • Anonymous says:

    I sent my employer a request for flexible working on 5th December and still not heard anything back. Should I resend my email?

  • Anonymous says:

    I sent my employer a request for flexible working on 5th December and still not heard anything back. Should I resend my email?

  • Anonymous says:

    I have been working 16 hrs as a single parent, my employer now tells me that I am expected to work every other weekend as well as one late shift (7pm) per week, is this fair? Can they do that? Any advice would be appreciated as this also affects two other members of staff in the same position, thank you x

    Editor: You do not say how long you have been working this pattern and whether you are on fixed shifts. The following should give you the information you need, but if you need more please send a request via our Advice & Support/Q & A page box and we will then have your email to be able to reply directly.

  • Anonymous says:

    I have been working 16 hrs as a single parent, my employer now tells me that I am expected to work every other weekend as well as one late shift (7pm) per week, is this fair? Can they do that? Any advice would be appreciated as this also affects two other members of staff in the same position, thank you x

  • Anonymous says:

    I have been working 16 hrs as a single parent, my employer now tells me that I am expected to work every other weekend as well as one late shift (7pm) per week, is this fair? Can they do that? Any advice would be appreciated as this also affects two other members of staff in the same position, thank you x


Post a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Latest Flexible Working Articles

Read more on Flexible Working

Your Franchise Selection

Click the button below to register your interest with all the franchises in your selection

Request FREE Information Now

Your Franchise Selection

This franchise opportunity has been added to your franchise selection

image

title

Click the button below to register your interest with all the franchises in your selection

Request FREE Information Now


You may be interested in these similar franchises