Interview tips for contractors and freelancers

Freelancers and contractors may have to attend more interviews than most. It's a chance to hone their skills, say 1st Contact Umbrella.

As a freelancer or contractor, it’s likely that you will have to go for more interviews than the average employee. Contracts have the tendency to roll over quite frequently (depending on your industry) and therefore, it is very important that you have good interview skills.

The following tips can help you prepare for interview success:

Plan ahead

Preparation is key and it will improve your chance of success in an interview. It is important to research the company, as well as the position you are applying for. This will improve your understanding of the role you will potentially be fulfilling and the company’s products or services. Read through the job description thoroughly and make sure you know any technical jargon that you do not understand. It is very possible that it will come up in the questions that the interviewer asks. Also, try to understand the challenges the client may be facing and come up with possible solutions.

Review your CV

Take some time before the interview to read over your CV. This is a good way to review your work experience. Pick out experiences in your CV that specifically relate to the job’s description and your role. This will prove your ability to do the job. Recall past achievements and ensure that you are able to present these with confidence.

Have fun role playing

This may seem silly, but it is useful to practise a few answers to the typical questions that may be asked in an interview. This is a good way to ensure that you include all the important information in your answers, and it will prevent you from being completely thrown-off by questions you did not anticipate.

Understand the structure of an interview

Not all people will conduct an interview in the same manner, but by knowing the basic structure of an interview, you will feel more prepared and relaxed when going into an interview.

Below is one example of a basic interview structure:

Step 1: A chat about the company. This is often small talk and will help you relax.

Step 2: The interviewer may discuss his/her needs and what he/she is looking for and the reasons for this.

Step 3: Here is where you will sell yourself, as well as your solution and ideas. Make the interviewer aware that you are the right person for the job. Mention your goals and what you aim to achieve at the end of the project/contract.

Step 4: The interview will come to an end and this is the last time to for you to ‘show-off’ your personality, skill set and leave one last impression. Remember, the interview started the moment you walked into the door, make sure you can end it off on a confident note.

Be attentive

It is extremely important to listen carefully to the interviewer so that you can ask the right questions. This will demonstrate that you are interested in the company. Interviewers like it when you interact and engage in conversation. Take notes when the client starts addressing the project details etc as this will also help to demonstrate your interest.

After the interview

A good gesture would be to email the interviewer after the interview and thank them for their time.

If you are unsuccessful in an interview and you are not granted the contract, see it as a lesson and review your interview experience. Use it as an opportunity for further growth and preparation for your next interview.

Ask yourself, “Did I prepare enough and did I do enough research?” If you feel that there were questions you couldn’t answer with ease then practise different ways of answering those questions.

Remember, always relax, smile and use eye contact. Dress appropriately and look presentable.

By following the above tips, you should be well prepared and have the necessary resources to succeed in your next interview.

*This article was written by 1st Contact Umbrella. To find out more information about the services their umbrella company provides, please visit the website.


Comments [2]

  • Anonymous says:

    "A good gesture would be to email the interviewer after the interview and thank them for their time."

    That is dreadful advice, and reeks of desperation and stalkerish tendencies. Either the meeting was valuable for both of you, or it wasn't. If it was, neither of you need thank the other – what you got out of it should be enough.

    Editor: This is recommended by experts, including the head of Reed.

  • Anonymous says:

    "A good gesture would be to email the interviewer after the interview and thank them for their time."

    That is dreadful advice, and reeks of desperation and stalkerish tendencies. Either the meeting was valuable for both of you, or it wasn't. If it was, neither of you need thank the other – what you got out of it should be enough.

    Editor: This is recommended by experts, including the head of Reed.


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