Parents say worries about children’s mental health affect performance

A significant number of working parents are finding their work performance impacted by worries about their children’s mental health, according to a new survey.

Psychotherapist working with young man in office,

 

A growing number of working parents are worried about their children’s mental health and many says it is affecting their performance at work and costing employers an estimated £8bn annually, according to a new survey.

Deloitte’s fourth annual mental health report, published in collaboration with Place 2 Be and Mind and based on a survey of 3,156 workers, found 46% of working parents are concerned about their children’s mental health and half of these say it impacts their performance at work. The report’s estimate of the cost to employers takes into account parents and carers taking time off work to care for their children, the impact on their performance and decisions to leave their roles.

A majority of working parents (63%) who were concerned about their children’s mental health, say they turn to external sources of support to manage their children’s mental health challenges, rather than approaching their employer for additional support. Of those who are concerned about their children’s mental health, a third (32%) have looked to reduce their working hours and 19% have turned to their employer for additional support, such as an employee support line or sought flexible working arrangements.

Juggling demands of work alongside caring for a child with mental health difficulties led to 10% of parents taking up to five days off per year to support their children. One in a hundred working parents have left their jobs because of the poor mental health of their children.

The focus on children’s mental health is just one part of Deloitte’s report, which estimates the cost to employers of poor mental health is £51bn per year. This is a decrease from £55bn in 2021, but an increase from £45bn in 2019. Presenteeism is the largest contributor, where people work in spite of illness and do not perform at their full ability, which the report estimates costs employers around £24 bn annually.

The report finds that the mental health of younger employees has improved and that 58% of respondents say their mental wellbeing is good or excellent. However, the report found an increase in some elements of burnout. 63% of respondents said they were exhibiting at least one sign of burnout, such as feeling of exhaustion, mental distance from their job or a decline in performance at work, an increase from 51% in the previous year’s survey.

Overall, the main concerns affecting the mental health of workers are the increasing cost of living (60%), personal/family finances (46%), and job security (22%). Working parents were most concerned about the rising cost of living (65%), alongside family finances (55%) and about the mental health of their children (29%).



Post a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Your Franchise Selection

Click the button below to register your interest with all the franchises in your selection

Request FREE Information Now

Your Franchise Selection

This franchise opportunity has been added to your franchise selection

image

title

Click the button below to register your interest with all the franchises in your selection

Request FREE Information Now


You may be interested in these similar franchises