Ministry of Justice: What makes Employment Tribunals so crucial

Employee Rights

 

Justice only exists as a concept if it’s available to everyone, which is what makes Employment Tribunals so crucial. They were established to ensure justice for employers and employees alike, and are now a vital part of the system.

What would happen to justice if there wasn’t justice for all?

Justice only exists as a concept if it’s available to everyone, which is what makes Employment Tribunals so crucial. They were established to ensure justice for employers and employees alike, and are now a vital part of the system.

To help ensure each case is fair and unbiased, our panels feature non-legal members as well as a judge. Their insight into employer/employee relations, informs the final decision. It’s also a way for them to demonstrate a subject that’s close to their hearts, namely justice for all.

The Employment Tribunals are independent judicial bodies who determine disputes between employers and employees over employment rights. The tribunals now known as the Employment Tribunals were first established in 1964 as Industrial Tribunals. They hear claims about employment matters including unfair dismissal, redundancy payments and discrimination, and claims relating to wages and other payments.

The law requires that many employment disputes be heard by a Tribunal Panel that consists of an Employment Judge and two Members, one drawn from an “employer” and one from an “employee” panel. Once appointed, however, you will be performing a judicial role and not representing either side.

This involves sitting on a panel for at least 15 days a year, alongside a judge and another Member. You’ll read the case history, assimilate lots of data in a short time, identifying the issue and offer your own impartial experience and insight. You will then apply the law under direction from the Employment Judge.

It’s essentially a fact-finding exercise with the aim of coming to a just, unbiased decision. What you won’t do is represent either party – it’s purely your experience, knowledge and impartiality which are needed.

Find out more about the skills and experience you’ll need, according to your specialist background as an employer or employee representative at www.employmenttribunalmembers.co.uk





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