Parents admit to heavily influencing children – particularly girls – in career choice 

Six in 10 parents admit to trying to push their child down a particular career route, with many saying it’s to try and convince them to follow the path they wish they had taken, according to a new survey.

Six in 10 parents admit to trying to push their child down a particular career route, with many saying it’s to try and convince them to follow the path they wish they had taken, according to a new survey.

Almost four in ten admit they think they have piled too much pressure on their children over their career choices.

The study for British Glass also found that one in five parents are more likely to try and influence their daughters’ choices, compared to just 13% who heap more pressure on their sons.

The study of 2,000 parents of children aged 13 and over found that 61% admit to trying to influence their child’s career choices in some way.

But while 28% just drop the odd hint, 27% admit they just come out and tell their child exactly what they want them to do.

Some 38% say they have enlisted the help of a friend or even their child’s friend to help talk their child into, or out of, a particular decision about their career or education choice.

Researchers found that while 68% try to talk their children into a certain route because they want nothing but the best for them, three in 10 said it’s because they want them to go to university.

Almost one in five believe their children are more capable than they think while 16% don’t want to be stuck in the same career they have been.

Wanting them to study a certain subject at college or university, earn a particular amount of money or even not wanting them to go to university at all are also among the reasons for parents encouraging their children down certain career paths.

Almost four in 10 have rowed with their children because they were trying to talk them into something or they were making a decision they didn’t agree with.

But one in three admitted they worry that pushing their child into a certain job or career may lead to them being unhappy in the future, with a quarter regretting the impression they tried to make on their offspring.

Half (52%) of respondents admitted to being a pushy parent, while a further 77% owned up to trying to influence their child’s decisions once in a while.

 





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