Pressure to lose baby weight fuelled by celebrity culture

New mums feel under pressure to lose weight quickly after giving birth because they’re surrounded by images of celebrities who snap back into shape immediately, reveals a new survey.

New mums feel under pressure to lose weight quickly after giving birth because they’re surrounded by images of celebrities who snap back into shape immediately, reveals a new survey.
A study by the Royal College of Midwives (RCM) shows nearly six out of 10 (59%) mothers felt that celebrity culture put more pressure on them to lose their post-pregnancy weight quickly.
And 85% rated the overall care that they received from midwives regarding healthy eating and weight management as ‘neutral’, ‘poor’, or ‘very poor’.
An overwhelming 95% of the 6,226 mothers surveyed, said that during pregnancy they did not go to NHS-provided antenatal classes that addressed nutrition and weight management.
Obesity was one of the top three issues previously identified by heads of midwidery in the RCM’s pay review body evidence as contributing to the increased complexity of maternity cases now stretching the midwifery workforce.
Of the women polled, 89% said that after giving birth they did not have the opportunity to discuss healthy eating and weight management issues with their midwife.
RCM general secretary Cathy Warwick said the survey painted a ‘worrying picture’ because midwives did not seem to have enough time to discuss concerns about obesity with mothers.
She said: ”There is a real need to address the issue of obesity, and this survey shows this is particularly important for women.  The growing volume of evidence shows that the health of an obese mother is further compromised by the pregnancy and also has an impact on the health of her unborn baby.
”Poorer health for mother and child can also lead to a greater future strain on health services and resources.  This is something that also has major effects before and beyond pregnancy and it needs to be addressed as a matter of urgency.  The exaggeration of risks is being used to demonise the idea that an overweight mother can’t have a normal birth without medical interventions.”
She warned: ”As a result of the increase in obesity among pregnant women in the UK, midwives are dealing with more complex births – on top of the continuing baby boom.
”These women need to see a midwife as early as possible in their pregnancy, and midwives need more time to spend with these women to help and advise them, as well as involving the wider health care team.  NHS trusts should be making sure that they have the resources in place to do this.”





Post a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *