Professional women consider freezing eggs to advance careers

Women as young as 20 are considering freezing their eggs in order to focus on their careers and preserve their fertility until they are well established in their jobs.

Women as young as 20 are considering freezing their eggs in order to focus on their careers and preserve their fertility until they are well established in their jobs.
 
This is according to a report by the Times newspaper which shows that researchers from the University of Leeds, suggest that there is growing demand for egg-freezing among young women, particularly those who have decided on a career such as medicine that will involve many years of training.
 
A total of 85% of medical students, with an average age of 21, said they would be prepared to delay starting a family for career reasons. Sixty-nine per cent of the sample would be happy to store eggs on ice as insurance against later infertility.
 
Despite the claims, there is no evidence to show that more than a handful of students will actually go ahead and freeze their eggs.
 
Dr Gorthi, who presented the study to the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology conference in Rome, said that women should not use egg-freezing as a reason to leave it too late to start a family: “It isn’t an insurance policy, it can fail.”
 
Freezing eggs has until recently been restricted to cancer and IVF patients. Improved techniques in the past five years has led many clinics to offer social freezing at a cost of about £2,000 plus annual storage fees, reports the paper. 





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