Survey reveals high levels of poor management

Over a quarter of British employees don’t respect their manager and 48% are not motivated by them, according to a new management survey from the People 1st Training Company and ICM.

Over a quarter of British employees don’t respect their manager and 48% are not motivated by them, according to a new management survey from the People 1st Training Company and ICM.

The findings highlight the impact that poor management and communication skills are taking on Britain’s economy – high staff turnover, low retention, poor customer service, and reduced productivity.

The survey shows that 1 in 3 (36%) say that their supervisors fail to provide clear instructions, whilst one in four (23%) don’t like their managers. A high proportion of workers (39%) also reveal that their managers fail to provide constructive criticism and a quarter of employees (27%) confide that their superiors talk down to them.

“Inevitably, the way that people feel about their business influences the way in which they interact with customers and on the customer experience,” claims Sharon Glancy, director of The People 1st Training Company. “There is strong evidence that effective employee engagement improves job satisfaction, organisational commitment and empowerment and has a direct impact on business performance. It’s critical that companies are fully aware of the impact that poor management and communication skills have on their business, particularly in the run-up to the Olympic Games and other high-profile events. From our experience, training that uses neuro-linguistic programming such as our Accelerated Behavioural Change programme addresses some of these issues.”

She added: “In these tough economic conditions, managers need to have the skills to lead staff effectively in order to deliver exceptional customer service. Loyalty, morale, performance and productivity are all hit when management gets it wrong. Almost half of respondents feel that their superiors have failed to help develop their careers. For a business to perform consistently well it needs a steady stream of effective leaders. Failing to develop and nurture staff indicates short-term thinking amongst a significant number of managers.”

Miles Templeman, director general at the Institute of Directors (IoD) says: “Old authoritarian styles of management are fast becoming obsolete as the findings highlight. Employees expect to be recognised and respected for the contribution they make to their organisation and expect far more from their leaders and managers, particularly during these turbulent economic times. Those who succeed very often appreciate the value of their staff and are able to inspire a self-generating machine that takes ownership for their part in driving forward the business by providing an exceptional customer experience.”

Nearly three-quarters (73%) of employees report that their managers recognise their contribution at work and 68% feel that their managers are accessible. Regional variations showed employees in the North East are amongst the most likely to dislike their managers (37%) while employees in the South West are most likely to like their managers (85%). The likeability of managers is amongst its lowest the further north you travel in England. Admiration for managers is amongst its highest in East England, with 89% of interviewees saying they respect their managers.





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