Tribunal rules on pregnancy discrimination

A Tribunal has ruled that a serving Royal Air Force officer was discriminated against by her superiors because she was pregnant.

A Tribunal has ruled that a serving Royal Air Force officer was discriminated against by her superiors because she was pregnant.
According to a report by the Daily Telegraph, the officer, from Oxford was awarded more than £16,000 after the tribunal concluded she had been subjected to an “intimidating, degrading and hostile” environment.
The officer told the tribunal that she was removed from her post in the Falkland Islands after telling her superiors that she was 12 weeks pregnant in July 2008. It was claimed that the officer’s promotion prospects were also delayed.
Finding in favour of the officer, the tribunal found that her request to continue in her role was wrongfully denied despite her husband, also an RAF officer, also being based on the island. The officer was ordered to return immediately to the UK after assessments found that she would be a risk. This was rejected by the tribunal.
It is understood that she was initially told she could stay on the island but this was later overruled by a more senior officer. She had wanted to be with her husband during her pregnancy but was later forced to take leave to return to the Falkland Islands.
Experts said the ruling will likely pave the way for a change in the rules governing how pregnant officers serving in the British armed forces are treated.
The officer was awarded more than £16,000.




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