Unemployment falls with a rise in full-time jobs

The number of women in work rose to a five-year high between May and July this year, almost entirely fuelled by part-time jobs, according to figures from the Office for National Statistics.

Unemployment fell by 0.1% to 7.7% between May and July, according to the latest figures from the Office for National Statistics, with those in full-time work rising to 94,000 and those in part-time work falling by 14,000 on the previous quarter.

While the number of men in part-time jobs fell in the last quarter, it rose for women. The figures show that over the last five years the number of women in work has risen to a five-year high almost entirely fuelled by part-time jobs. The number of women working full-time has increased by 39,000 to reach 7.94 million, but the number of women working part-time increased by 279,000 to reach 5.95 million.

The number of men in work for May to July 2013 was 15.95 million, virtually the same as five years previously. However, the number of men working full-time fell by 272,000 to reach 13.85 million, while the number of men working part-time increased by 281,000 to reach 2.10 million. 

Between May to July 2008 and May to July 2013, the number of employees and self-employed people who were working part-time because they could not find a full time job more than doubled from 689,000 to 1.45 million. For May to July 2013, almost a third of male employees and self-employed people who were working part-time were doing so because they could not find a full-time job. The corresponding figure for women was 13.5%.

The number of people claiming Jobseeker’s Allowance (JSA) fell by 32,600 between July and August to reach 1.40 million and, over the year, was down 168,100. The number of JSA claimants is the lowest since February 2009.

Average weekly earnings excluding bonus payments rose by 1.0% comparing May to July 2013 with the same period a year earlier. Average weekly earnings including bonus payments rose by 1.1% comparing May to July 2013 with the same period a year earlier. 

 




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