Unemployment figures fall

Unemployment fell by 49,000 to 2.51 million between July and September with the number of people in full-time jobs rising by 51,000 and the number in part-time jobs increasing by 49,000, according to statistics from the Office for National Statistics.

The employment rate for men and women was up 0.2 per cent on the previous quarter. The number of people in employment was 29.58 million for July to September 2012, up 100,000 from April to June 2012 and up 513,000 on a year earlier.

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However, the number of people claiming Jobseeker’s Allowance increased by 10,100 between September and October 2012 to reach 1.58 million.

Between July to September 2011 and July to September 2012, total pay for employees in Great Britain rose by 1.8 per cent.

The statistics also show the number of employees increased by 87,000 to reach 25.11 million while the number of self-employed people fell by 11,000 to reach 4.19 million.

Gerwyn Davies, Labour Market Adviser at the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD), said: “Employers have continued to focus on keeping labour costs down and a combination of pay restraint and a higher proportion of part-time and temporary work has enabled them to take on more staff. Of particular note this month is the disproportionately large increase in part-time employment. Almost half of the employment increase is due to part-time employment, and almost all of this increase is accounted for by women.

“Despite the positive headline figures, the high proportions of part-time and temporary work suggest that many employers remain cautious about adding to their long-term cost base. Business confidence has improved in recent months but is still fragile. So while we may see further short-term increases in employment and it may be some time before this translates into the permanent positions that most job-seekers prefer.”





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