Women better at interview, but still less likely to get the job

Women perform better at interviews, have better presentation, communication, motivation skills, understand companies and cultures better, are more thorough, affable and better able to balance multiple tasks and yet, according to 42.7% of senior management surveyed by TheLadders.co.uk, they will not get the top job because they fear that women will leave to have children. Plus other news.
Women perform better at interviews, have better presentation, communication, motivation skills, understand companies and cultures better, are more thorough, affable and better able to balance multiple tasks and yet, according to 42.7% of senior management surveyed by TheLadders.co.uk, they will not get the top job because they fear that women will leave to have children.
A poll of 500 bosses by TheLadders.co.uk, a careers site that specialises in £50K plus jobs and executives, found that 59% agree that women perform best at interview with women, outdoing men in 11 out of 18 criteria necessary for successful job meetings.
Senior managers cited qualifications (80%), fit (working as part of the team and company culture) (70.8%) and personality (65.5%) as the top three considerations in choosing the right candidate. When asked which gender delivered these criteria at interview, an overwhelming number pointed to women. Some 59% of bosses believe women present their skills more effectively, 63.9% say women understand the company culture and 72.3% find women more affable and personable in an interview situation.
However, when asked why there are not as many women who secure the top jobs, almost half of those surveyors said it was because they fear that women will leave to have children. 54% agree that there simply aren’t as many female candidates as male ones and 51% say that society just expects men to be in leadership roles. Some 38% feel that there is still inherent sexism in the workplace.
A further 45% say that women are simply less assertive when it comes to negotiating the top jobs and top salaries and 44.7% feel that lower pay and recognition for women is part of business stereotyping. Over one quarter of those surveyed believe men are rewarded for being more committed than women in their jobs.

Derek Pilcher, Managing Director of TheLadders.co.uk agrees with many respondents who say that whilst women are as qualified as men for senior positions, they simply aren’t applying. “This could be for a number of reasons which may well include the belief that men dominate the top jobs and this scares women from going for interview. Yet women obviously shine at interview and as such should be securing the top jobs when they apply. What is concerning is the un-spoken reasons for not employing women, and in particular the fear of losing female management after they have had children. This too may be seriously impacting the number of women who make it through to leadership roles.”

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