Women doctors paid thousands less than men

Women NHS doctors are paid an average of £15,245 a year less than their male counterparts, according to the first report to investigate doctors’ gender pay gap.

Women NHS doctors are paid an average of £15,245 a year less than their male counterparts, according to the first report to investigate doctors’ gender pay gap.
The study, by the British Medical Association, found that part of the pay gap was due to the age and experience of doctors, but at least 40% of the gap could be attributed to discrimination. After accounting for age, experience and area of specialism, female consultants typically earned £5,500 less than their male peers and female junior doctors’ pay was around £2,000 less than that of their male counterparts.
"Our results show that men and women with identical experience and expertise are paid differently – which suggests evidence of discrimination," concludes the report, which is published on Friday.
One of the report’s authors, Dr Anita Holdcroft, emeritus professor of anaesthesia at Imperial College, said part of the problem was the “hostile culture” women doctors operated in. She cited the example of working mums who she said had little room to manoeuvre in pay negotiations as they are less likely to leave.
"The man will often recognise the weakness of the woman’s negotiating position because she has children and so can’t move," she told The Guardian. "Discrimination is the only way that we can explain the gender pay gap."
The authors want organisations that employ doctors to conduct more wide-ranging salary reviews and pay audits. Read more

 





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