Work worries stop Britons getting a good night’s sleep

Nearly three quarters of Brits are struggling to get a good night’s sleep because of work worries, reveals a new survey.

Nearly three quarters of Brits are struggling to get a good night’s sleep because of work worries, reveals a new survey.
Almost seven out of 10 adults (69%) told a poll by bedmakers Slumberland that problems they were suffering at work made it difficult to fall asleep.
Half of the 3,000 people surveyed said the recent credit crunch and recession means they worry about work more than they used to, while nearly one in four adults (39%) said they wake up in the early hours fretting about their careers at least once a night.
A quarter say their general heavy workload plays on their mind at night and an anxious one in five said worrying about a particular problematic task prevents restful sleep.
Even those who do manage to nod off don’t necessarily escape work worries – nearly a third (29%) dream about jobs at least twice a week.  Sundays are the most common night for a work-related dream.
The British Journal of Cancer published a study in 2008 which indicated that a lack of sleep can greatly increase the risk of breast cancer, with women who slept six hours or fewer every night having a significantly higher risk.
Those who slept six h ours or few each night had a 62% higher risk of getting breast cancer, whereas those who slept nine hours or more every night had a 28% lower risk.
Chris Tattersall, from Slumberland, said: ”It’s understandable that people dream about work as it’s such a key part of our lives, but it’s important not to let stress levels affect sleep.
”Getting enough rest is directly linked to performance and health – it is ironic and unfortunate that stress from jobs seems to be a barrier to the sleep needed to function and recover.”
Nearly half of those polled (46%) said they check their phone for work-related emails as soon as they open their eyes, and four out of 10 said they feel they are back in to the grind of work before they are even up and dressed.
But more than six out of 10 (61%) believed they would sleep more soundly if they landed their dream job.
”We should all be doing our utmost to ensure we get the best night’s sleep possible,” said Tattersall. ”Adopt a nighttime routine, switch off lights and electrics, and invest in a comfortable, supportive bed.”





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